almost any

  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    In English we distinguish between almost any and almost all. It's slight, but the distinction is there.
    Almost any user is able means no matter which user you select they would be able.
    Almost all users are able means most users are able.
    The distinction is slight, I grant you, but can you think of how to say that in Italian?
     

    effeundici

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    In English we distinguish between almost any and almost all. It's slight, but the distinction is there.
    Almost any user is able means no matter which user you select they would be able.
    Almost all users are able means most users are able.
    The distinction is slight, I grant you, but can you think of how to say that in Italian?
    I can catch the grammatical difference but is there any substantial difference?

    Anyway, may be you could say:

    Quasi tutti gli utenti sono in grado...
    Praticamente qualsiasi utente è in grado....

    but I'm not so sure
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Perhaps it's idiomatic and is used for emphasis but I can think of ways that are quite different in their usage. e.g.
    This is so easy almost any person could do it.
    Almost all my work is done.
    But following what MS wrote qualunque persona and Quasi tutti il mio lavoro is this correct?
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I'm not sure I understand. Are you saying that
    almost any and any
    have the same meaning?
    Almost any user and any user have the same meaning?
    No my mistake!
    ALmost any user means among all the users the vast majority would be able. Which is very close to almost all but the emphasis is different.
     

    Danieloid

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Rose said:
    No my mistake!
    ALmost any user means among all the users the vast majority would be able. Which is very close to almost all but the emphasis is different.
    Ah, ok. So I don't get the difference in emphasis. Note also that in Italian we don't say "Quasi chiunque potrebbe farlo". We usually translate "Quasi tutti", both almost any and almost all.
     

    effeundici

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    Note also that in Italian we don't say "Quasi chiunque potrebbe farlo". We usually translate "Quasi tutti", both almost any and almost all.
    Non lo diciamo? E invece ora che lo leggo mi sembra un'ottima traduzione, alla quale non avevo pensato, di almost any.

    Che ne dici?

    Edit: oddio, ormai nessuna espressione e tutte hanno senso!!
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    It might be hard to explain the emphasis but I'll give it a try.
    Almost all people who come here are smart. Nine out ten people who come here are smart.
    Almost anyone who comes here is smart. Any individual who walks through that door, chances are, they're smart.
    Starting to make sense?
     

    effeundici

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    It might be hard to explain the emphasis but I'll give it a try.
    Almost all people who come here are smart. Nine out ten people who come here are smart.
    Almost anyone who comes here is smart. Any individual who walks through that door, chances are 9 out of ten, they're smart.
    Starting to make sense?
    No:)
     

    Danieloid

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Non lo diciamo? E invece ora che lo leggo mi sembra un'ottima traduzione, alla quale non avevo pensato, di almost any.
    Può essere… a me pare inusuale, ma potrei sbagliarmi. :)

    Rose said:
    It might be hard to explain the emphasis but I'll give it a try.
    Almost all people who come here are smart. Nine out ten people who come here are smart.
    Almost anyone who comes here is smart. Any individual who walks through that door, chances are, they're smart.
    Starting to make sense?
    No problems with almost all.
    Reading your second example I note chances are. Are we talking about probability? So we could say:
    Probabilmente chiunque potrebbe farlo.
     

    Murphy

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I think that the difference in emphasis is that "almost all" treats the people/objects referred to as a collective, while "almost any" treats them as individuals.

    Almost all the students in this class are capable of passing the exam.
    Almost any student in this class is capable of passing the exam.

    Consequently, while the meaning may be almost identical, each sentence has a slightly different grammatical structure.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    F11 almost all looks at the whole group and says that out of the whole group chances are...
    Almost any looks at the individual and says that chances are that this particular person is...
    Hey I did say it was slight!
     

    effeundici

    Senior Member
    Italian - Tuscany
    F11 almost all looks at the whole group and says that out of the whole group chances are...
    Almost any looks at the individual and says that chances are that this particular person is...
    Hey I did say it was slight!
    I can understand what you mean but I think that the meaning is exactly the same.

    I'll prove it to you :):):

    0,9 x 10 = 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 + 0,9 x 1 = 9
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Yes Yes Yes the final outcome is the same but how you got there is different. That's why I say it's also used for emphasis.
    Almost anyone could understand this!! Are you just a little slow on the uptake...?
    Almost all could understand this. I'm not talking about you, so don't be so sensitive, but the whole group you came with.
     

    Danieloid

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Rose, probably English and Italian are different here. Your last post suggested to me an example.
    "Almost anyone could do that. Almost anyone but you!" (I hope my English is correct here)
    We'd say:
    "Tutti potrebbero farlo. Tutti tranne te!"
    We even use a different word!
    And regarding almost any and almost all, I think that for us the meaning is exactely the same.
    We have a difference in emphasis if we use "any" and "all", ("ognuno" e "tutti" - individuals vs collective - Murphy's post #15) but the word "almost" changes the scenary!
     

    MStraf

    Senior Member
    Scsua ma come fanno a stare insieme almost e qualunque????:confused:
    Infatti non vanno :) ma qui si parla di "almost any", che sinceramente tradurrei in italiano come "any" (qualunque) o con "quasi qualunque", se riferito a un sostantivo singolare

    quasi qualunque persona e' in grado di farlo
    quasi tutte le persone sono in grado di farlo

    Quello che mi ricordo e' che "any" significa "almeno un elemento del gruppo (soddisfa un criterio)", mentre "all" significa tutti gli elementi di un gruppo. Quindi, "almost any" significa che all'interno di un gruppo c'e' ne quasi sempre uno o piu' elementi (che soddifano un criterio), mentre "almost all" significa "quasi tutti gli elementi"
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I think MStraf's explanation refers to any used with an interrogative or negative. Here it's different.

    Maybe part of the problem is in using the word quasi with qualunque; these two qua- words sound bad together. So what about praticamente qualsiasi persona or praticamente chiunque?

    A difference between anyone and everyone (which may not be applicable in all cases): I look at a mathematical problem and find it very easy, so I say Anyone can solve this problem. This means una persona qualsiasi. If I say Everyone can solve this problem it means that everyone has tried and succeeded.

    - What would you like to eat?
    - Anything that's in the fridge.
    This means it's not important what we eat. If I say Everything that's in the fridge it means I want to empty the fridge!

    - Where would you like to go?
    - Anywhere!
    This means Da qualsiasi parte. You can't say Everywhere!

    It may be that in Almost anyone can do it we are referring to a hypothetical individual, while Almost everyone can do it refers to everyone collectively. Could we express the difference in Italian as:
    - Praticamente chiunque lo saprebbe fare.
    - Quasi tutti lo sanno fare.
    Wat do the Italians think?
     
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