Almost everywhere in England...is within easy reach of a dozen or more National Trust properties...

marcogaiotto

Senior Member
Italian
Almost everywhere in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is within easy reach of a dozen or more National Trust properties open to the public.

Hello! Please, can you give me a helping hand? What does the sentence above really means?
It is a text about the houses and other prpoperties owned by the Trust.
Does it mean that "everywhere is near a property which belongs to the National Trust and is open to the public.", that is, more simply, "you can find (and visit) almost everywhere in England, Wales and Northern Ireland such houses and other properties."?
Thanks a lot beforehand!
 
  • User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English - U.S. (Texas)
    It means that wherever you are in England, Wales or Northern Island, you can easily get to a dozen or more such properties.

    Yes, I think the general idea is simply that there are many such properties, and they are distributed across the country.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It implies that wherever you live or are staying in the UK, a number of National Trust tourist sites are within easy reach (since there are so many of them).


    cross-posted and agreeing
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Can you explain why, kentix? Would something like "Everywhere in England is within 75 miles of the sea" sound equally strange?
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    The whole sentence sounds odd, clumsy, and back-to-front.

    The wording "Almost everywhere ... is within easy reach of ... National Trust properties ..." sounds as if the National Trust properties are capable of going out and reaching other places, whereas the only logical interpretation is that (some of) the properties are within easy reach of (wherever you happen to be).
    .
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Google tells me that the sentence is from The National Trust Guide, by L. Greeves & M. Trinick.

    I suppose that's why the sentence is constructed from the National Trust's point of view.

    .....
    Added.

    Thinking about it:
    Would you also feel that "Everywhere in England is within easy reach of the sea" is the wrong way round?
     
    Last edited:

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    To me, everywhere is a plural place and doesn't fit with "is". "Almost" just makes it worse. I can't figure out the place where "almost everywhere" is.

    I think this would be better.

    Almost every place in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is within easy reach of a dozen...

    But then you still have the problem, if you think about it, that the National Trust places are doing the traveling.

    A dozen or more National Trust properties open to the public are within easy reach of almost every place in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Exactly. It’s the NT properties themselves that are within easy reach (= easy to get to) — as I said in #3.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    There may be a BrE/AmE difference here on "everywhere".

    And the more I think about it - see eg the Edit to my previous post - the more I think the sentence isn't the wrong way round;)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Here's an OED citation where "within reach" has, I think, to be the National Trust way round:

    1897 E. Coues New Light Early Hist. Greater Northwest I. 29 The steersman, finding himself within reach of the shore, jumped upon the rock with one of the midmen.

    Anyway, I think Marco has his answer!:):thumbsup:
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Can you explain why, kentix? Would something like "Everywhere in England is within 75 miles of the sea" sound equally strange?
    When I read the first couple of posts (before reading yours) I also came up with this concept which, for some reason, has stuck with me ever since I first heard it. However, I always remember it as "Nowhere in England is further than 75 miles of the sea". I wonder whether this form suffers the same objection?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I suppose that's why the sentence is constructed from the National Trust's point of view.

    Would you also feel that "Everywhere in England is within easy reach of the sea" is the wrong way round?
    Your example is reversible - if A is close to B, then B is close to A. The OP has an important addition.
    The sentence says "Everywhere in England is within reach of 12 sites." The other 30,000 sites must all be in Australia.
     

    Rival

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Would you also feel that "Everywhere in England is within easy reach of the sea" is the wrong way round?
    That sentence would be fine in the context of Global Warming --> Polar ice caps melting --> cataclysmic flooding --> "Everywhere in England is within easy reach of the sea".

    But if it's just Mum and Dad taking the nippers to the beach for the day, then it must be the sea that's within easy reach.

    Well, that's how I've always read and understood the phrase, anyway.
    .
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, it's clear that in this thread (a) I'm not within reach of victory, and (b) victory is not within my reach. So I'll give in and go and visit a local National Trust property:D.
     
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