<Almost / nearly etc.> + a specific time

A-friend

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
Hello everyone

I was wondering which one of the following options works properly in my provided example and which one doesn't and why?

Example:

A) Did you arrive to work on time?

B) Yes, fortunately; everybody has to be at work at 8:00 a.m. everyday. I managed to arrive _________ ‪7:50 o’clock‬.
A) Sounds great. So you could arrive _________ on time.

a. almost
b. nearly
c. practically
d. roughly
e. approximately
f. about
g. around

To me, they all mean more or less the same and work properly in this sense. The only point that I consider always using these all is that "approximately" is a formal word and rarely is used in daily speech, while "practically" is an absolutely casual choice among all.
 
  • RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    A) Did you arrive to at work on time?

    B) Yes, fortunately; everybody has to be at work at 8:00 a.m. everyday. I managed to arrive at _________ ‪7:50 o’clock‬.
    A) Sounds great. So you could arrive _________ on time.

    a. almost
    b. nearly
    c. practically
    d. roughly
    e. approximately
    f. about
    g. around

    To me, they all mean more or less the same and work properly in this sense. The only point that I consider always using these all is that "approximately" is a formal word and rarely is used in daily speech, while "practically" is an absolutely casual choice among all.
    For me, "approximately" is much too formal for this conversation. "Practically" doesn't work in the first blank. The other words do work, but "almost" and "nearly" do not mean the same as the other three. And I wouldn't put anything in the second blank.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    For me, "approximately" is much too formal for this conversation. "Practically" doesn't work in the first blank. The other words do work, but "almost" and "nearly" do not mean the same as the other three. And I wouldn't put anything in the second blank.
    Thank you RM1(SS), but I wonder what "roughly" means here? Does it mean "a little more or less" (like "approximately")?
     

    jwood

    Member
    English (USA)
    Yes, “roughly”, “about” and “approximately” all have the same meaning. “Roughly” and “about” would be the most common in a casual, everyday conversation.
     
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