along with are / are along with

farhad_persona

Banned
Farsi
Hello,

Which one is better?


Karate and taekwondo are, along with judo and kung fu, subsumed under the category of martial arts.

or

Karate and taekwondo, along with judo and kung fu, are subsumed under the category of martial arts.
 
  • Possibly the first is slightly preferable *as a construction.*

    1) Karate and taekwondo are, along with judo and kung fu, subsumed under the category of martial arts.


    2) Karate and taekwondo, along with judo and kung fu, are subsumed under the category of martial arts
    Also possible:

    3)Karate and taekwondo are subsumed, along with judo and kung fu, under the category of martial arts.

    Note how the second construction, for a more complicated case, is hard to read because of the distance of the subject from the predicate.


    2*
    Karate and taekwondo, along with other methods developed in Asia, such as judo and kung fu, are subsumed under the category of martial arts. (harder to read)

    Here, the construction of 1) or 3) seems easier .

    1* Karate and taekwondo are, along with other methods developed in Asia, such as judo and kung fu, subsumed under the category of martial arts. (easier)

    3* Karate and taekwondo are subsumed, along with other methods developed in Asia, such as judo and kung fu, under the category of martial arts. (perhaps easiest?)
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Which one is better?

    Karate and taekwondo are, along with judo and kung fu, subsumed under the category of martial arts.
    or
    Karate and taekwondo, along with judo and kung fu, are subsumed under the category of martial arts.
    While both are grammatically acceptable, I much prefer the second; it's a more natural construction.

    P.S.: At least in the US, the more usual spelling of the second martial art you mention is tae kwon do (three separate words).
     
    Well, let me clarify. I go with Parla and 2) as most natural. My hesitation expressed above is based on splitting subject and predicate--that *construction* found in 2). It is liable to abuse for more complex cases. In those I prefer 3), but take 2 as second best.

    And I should mention one more issue. Context. The native speakers place modifying phrases and clauses according to various considerations for which one needs a passage, some idea of what the person, overall, is trying to say, etc.

    Your question above is like asking native speakers, Which do you say, "These holidays, how are things going?" or "How are things going, these holidays?" You may get a scattering of answers.
     
    Last edited:
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