along with / simultaneously

cfu507

Senior Member
Hebrew
Hi everyone,
If stimulus 1 and stimulus 2 were presented at the same time (at the same slide), it is absolutely right to write that the stimuli were presented simultaneously.
If I would write that stimulus 1 was presented along with stimulus 2, would it be unmistakably/obviously that they were presented simultaneously, or "a long with" might be eligible also when there is an interval between the stimuli appearance (stimulus-onset-asynchrony)?
Thanks in advance
 
  • Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    In answer to your first sentence, Yes. If they appear at precisely the same time then they appear simultaneously.

    "Along with" (note this is two words, not three) is rather imprecise for your purposes, I think; it doesn't mean much beyond "and" or "with", so no great precision in terms of timing is conveyed. If there is an interval between the appearances, I think you will need to say so explicitly. Asynchronicity means that two events or series of events do not occur at the same time, or that they do not match in frequency, they are what we call "out of sync". "Along with" says nothing useful about this at all.
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    In answer to your first sentence, Yes. If they appear at precisely the same time then they appear simultaneously.

    "Along with" (note this is two words, not three) is rather imprecise for your purposes, I think; it doesn't mean much beyond "and" or "with", so no great precision in terms of timing is conveyed. If there is an interval between the appearances, I think you will need to say so explicitly. Asynchronicity means that two events or series of events do not occur at the same time, or that they do not match in frequency, they are what we call "out of sync". "Along with" says nothing useful about this at all.
    Thank you very much, Matching Mole. I will use "simultaneously".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top