Alongside a sedentary population lived...

brainstorming

Senior Member
Portugal, Portuguese
Hi everyone,

Can I use alongside in the following context?

Alongside a sedentary population lived a nomad population which nonetheless found a refuge in these cities, as the existence of hostelries proves.

thanks in advance
 
  • b1947420

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi everyone,

    Can I use alongside in the following context?

    Alongside a sedentary population lived a nomad population which nonetheless found a refuge in these cities, as the existence of hostelries proves.

    thanks in advance
    Yes! I don't see why not.

    The message being communicated is that of a nomad population living "in harmony" with the "sitting" population.
     

    brainstorming

    Senior Member
    Portugal, Portuguese
    the idea I want ot convey is that the sedentary people and the nomads were neighbours. Does my sentence expresses this idea?​
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    Not according to the WR Dictionary it doesn't.

    I suggest 'settled' instead.

    Rover
    "Lived alongside" conveys perfectly the idea that they were neighbours, doesn't it?

    I assume you're suggesting "settled" as an alternative to "sedentary", which is a separate question. This is fine, but the WR dictionary entry for "sedentary" is, quite frankly, poor. Most other dictionaries will give something along the lines of "tending to stay in one place for most of the time" as a possible definition. It is quite normal to refer to sedentary populations in contrast to nomadic or migratory ones.
     

    zartist

    Member
    English Italian
    I'm a little confused. If they are neighbours, living next to each other, aren't they both sedentary populations?
     

    pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    The only issue I have is a logical one. How can a static people live alongside a mobile one. By definition they nomads will not stay in the same place for long.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I don't really see any logical conflict. Nomads may be moving around the area, without a permanent settlement, but this doesn't necessarily mean that they ever travel very far away from the permanent settlement of the sedentary population. One could suppose that they are always living near each other, even though the nomadic population is not always in the same place.
    Really the sentence conveys the idea that the two populations coexisted in the same environment at the same time but lived in different ways.
     

    brainstorming

    Senior Member
    Portugal, Portuguese
    Sorry, maybe I've translated the sentence badly.

    I'll change it to :

    Alongside a ... there was a nomad population which nonetheless found a refuge in these cities...
     
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