alongside one's prayer and devotion makes be a bit dubious of that church

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
offer (something) up (to someone or something)
To give or submit something as an offering. The fact that you're expected to offer money up alongside one's prayer and devotion makes be a bit dubious of that church.
offer up

Does the underlined part make sense to you, especially the boldface parts?
Thank you.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I see.
    And what about "one's prayer"?

    To me, it should be:

    The fact that one is expected to offer money up alongside his or her/their prayer and devotion ...
    The fact that you're expected to offer money up alongside your prayer and devotion ...

    ... but not "you are ......... one's":(
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Re post #3, I think the original is OK, but of your two alternatives, only the second works.
    Hmm, "one" is an indefinite pronoun, and when referring to it again further in the sentence, you must use a personal pronoun ("his or her/their"). Likewise, "you" is a personal pronoun (even though it is used in the OP in the generic sense), and you can't refer to it further in the sentence by an indefinite one ("one").
    Am I wrong?
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say ' . . . one is expected to . . . one's prayer . . . '.

    In the original, going from 'you' to one' sounds OK to me, because the viewpoint changes. The 'you' is the generic 'you', and the 'one' is the slightly distant/formal 'one' that you might see in something like 'One offers up one's prayer in church'.

    I can't quite put my finger on it. Maybe it's just me. :)
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Maybe it's just me. :)
    Or rather a BE/AE difference?:)

    In the United States, the possessive and reflexive forms of one — one's and oneself — are often replaced by other pronoun forms. In British English, they are commonplace:


    • One must be conscientious about one's dental hygiene.

    In the U.S. that one's is apt to be replaced by a third-person "his" or (more informally) a second-person "your":


    • One must learn from one's [or his] mistakes.
    • One must be conscientious about one's [or his] dental hygiene.
    • One must be conscientious about your dental hygiene.
    On the Uses of One

    Also, I'm ok with keeping the first "one" later in the sentence too. But still, "one" repalcing "you" sounds wrong to me (as a non-native speaker though)
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Indeed. Mixing you and one that way is more evidence of poor editing in that entry. One/one = BE, you/you = BE and AE.

    If AE starts with one it is understood as "one person", so the subsequent reference needs a personal pronoun (his, her, his/her, their)
     
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