Already off to Monaco?

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Archer's boss, his mother, has been reviewing his operations account, which reveals that he uses operational funds for personal expenses rather than for his spy's work:
-- You turned in an expense report from Berlin where the German desk says you never checked in. Ditto Buenos Aires. Too busy to check in? Already off to Monaco? Or was it Mallorca?
Archer, TV series

Does that mean -- "You were so busy, that you did your job in Buenos Aires very quickly and didn't need to check in the hotel there, and so you just flew off to Monaco to do your job there." ?
Thank you.
 
  • Jason_2_toi

    Senior Member
    English-Scotland
    Off to
    means
    leaving for or left for.
    Compare the song lyrics
    We're off to see the Wizard
    The wonderful Wizard of Oz
     

    Jason_2_toi

    Senior Member
    English-Scotland
    Well, the inference is that Archer never visited any of these places. So the question is sarcastic.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    didn't need to check in the hotel there
    No, this means he didn't check in with the spy agency office there. Normally, he would be expected to let them know he had arrived and was on the job.

    the German desk
    That's the bureaucratic way of saying "the agency office in Berlin".

    The implication, as Jason says, is that he was never really there.

    Already off to Monaco? Or was it Mallorca?
    He probably told her he was going to Monaco next but now she doesn't trust him at all. She thinks whatever destination he gave is bogus. So she just makes one up (Mallorca) like she thinks he might be doing. It's a very, very half-hearted attempt to catch him in a lie (by seeing if he remembers where he told her he was going).

    -- Are you ready to leave for Monaco? Or did you say Mallorca?
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you, everyone.

    But I'm still unsure. Yes, I understand now that it means "leaving for", but, in combination with "already", what is the implication?
    I knew it's sarcasm, I'd like to know what "Already off to Monaco?" literally means.

    He probably told her where he was going to Monaco next but now she doesn't trust him at all.
    "Already" means he leaft for Monaco too quickly, right? But how does it fit the context?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    After some deep thought I understand it differently now. I think she is asking if his excuse for not checking in with the Berlin office is that he quickly left for Monaco before he could check in. But it doesn't make much actual sense because the very first thing he should have done when he got to Berlin, before he did anything else, was to check in.

    The part about catching him in a lie is still accurate, though.
     
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