Also vs Too

arjun78

Senior Member
India-Hindi
Hi Friends,

#1 I feel his love, but I also feel his hate.

#2 I feel his love, but I feel too his hate.

Can #2 be used instead of #1? Does it have the same meaning (that I feel his love and hate both)?


Thanks so much,
A
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    That's different from "I feel his hate too."

    "I too feel his hate" means that I and certain other people feel his hate: the "too" applies to "I", not to "hate".
     
    Last edited:

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    That's different from "I feel his hate too."

    "I too feel his hate" means that I and certain other people feel his hate: the "too" applies to "I", not to "hate".
    Thanks.

    I also feel his hate.
    I feel his hate also.


    Do these have the same meaning?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You might want to look at the usage note in Cambridge Dictionaries:
    Also, as well or too ? - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary

    I have highlighted the difference.
    We use also in the normal mid position for adverbs, between the subject and main verb, or after the modal verb or first auxiliary verb, or after be as a main verb. In this position, the meaning of also usually connects back to the whole clause that comes before ....

    In end position, also normally connects two phrases.
    In other words, in 'I also feel his hate', you are normally adding an additional proposition to what was said earlier. (For example: 'The atmosphere was very tense. I also feel his hate.')

    In 'I feel his hate also', it sounds as if 'his hate' is something else you feel. You are saying adding more information about what you feel. (For example: 'I can feel his gaze towards me. I feel his ate also.)
     
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