alternative plurals in -ové

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Assiduous student

Banned
English - UK
Hi, I've come across these. How would you choose between the plurals in -i and those in -ové? Thank you.

kamarádové, kamarádi
mužové, muži
pánové, páni
Čechové, Češi
Francouzové, Francouzi
 
  • jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    The only one in actual use is pánové. All other nouns in your list usually end in - i.
     

    MamStrach

    Member
    Czech - Praha
    Assiduous, in general, the usage is just idiomatic, such as in "Dámy a pánové" or Rusové, Srbové, etc. In some cases though, there's a slight difference in meaning between the "ové" and "i": it could connote a figurative sense, e.g. in "volové" vs. "voli", or personification in "dnové" vs. "dni" or "dny", or emphasis "velcí Čechové dvacátého století".
     

    Assiduous student

    Banned
    English - UK
    Assiduous, in general, the usage is just idiomatic, such as in "Dámy a pánové" or Rusové, Srbové, etc. In some cases though, there's a slight difference in meaning between the "ové" and "i": it could connote a figurative sense, e.g. in "volové" vs. "voli", or personification in "dnové" vs. "dni" or "dny", or emphasis "velcí Čechové dvacátého století".
    So Rusové is used? Or would a foreigner be recommended to stick to Rusi? Thanks.
     

    MamStrach

    Member
    Czech - Praha
    Definitely! Rusové is the prevalent form. Rusi sounds very archaic. You'll hear "Fini" or "Švédi" or "Arabi", but in formal speech and in writing I'd stick with Finové, Švédové, Arabové, etc. If in doubt, consult the Czech corpus, since there are no universal rules.
     

    Assiduous student

    Banned
    English - UK
    Definitely! Rusové is the prevalent form. Rusi sounds very archaic. You'll hear "Fini" or "Švédi" or "Arabi", but in formal speech and in writing I'd stick with Finové, Švédové, Arabové, etc. If in doubt, consult the Czech corpus, since there are no universal rules.
    OK. Do you agree with Jazyk above that Čechové and Francouzové are not in use?
    What about Polákové and Řekové? Maybe you're suggesting that all the nationalities should have -ové?

    This is the same plural ending as found in the Russian word сын, with сыновья in the plural (syn, synové) - but in that language, only one noun is declined in the plural like that.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    One-syllable nationalities indeed end in - ové: Ir - Irové, Dán - Dánové, Rus - Rusové. Švédi and Rusi are colloquial. Češi is common, Čechové much less, even though it has only one syllable.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Words that end in g always seem to take ové: biolog - biologové, for example.
     
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