Although he ..., yet he does not [Although + yet]

HajiSahib

Banned
Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
Although he is my brother, yet he does not resemble me.
Though he is my brother, yet he does not resemble me.
Although he is my brother, he does not resemble me.
Though he is my brother, but he does not resemble me.

Which of the above sentences are correct in English ?

Thank you..
 
  • Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    "Although" and "yet" (or "but") in the same sentence are incorrect. Only one "concessive" (although, though) or "contrastive" (but) adverb or conjunction is possible.

    Although he is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :cross:
    He is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :tick: (the "yet" makes it sound formal/literary, not conversational)
    Although he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    He is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :tick: (the "yet" makes it sound formal/literary, not conversational)
    Though he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    Though he is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :cross:
    Although he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    Though he is my brother, but he does not resemble me. :cross:
    Though he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    He is my brother, but he does not resemble me. :tick:
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    "Although" and "yet" (or "but") in the same sentence are incorrect. Only one "concessive" (although, though) or "contrastive" (but) adverb or conjunction is possible.

    Although he is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :cross:
    He is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :tick: (the "yet" makes it sound formal/literary, not conversational)
    Although he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    He is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :tick: (the "yet" makes it sound formal/literary, not conversational)
    Though he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    Though he is my brother, yet he does not resemble me. :cross:
    Although he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    Though he is my brother, but he does not resemble me. :cross:
    Though he is my brother, he does not resemble me. :tick:
    He is my brother, but he does not resemble me. :tick:
    Thank you very much for your kind reply...
    I just want to ask why *although* and *but/yet* cannot be used in the same sentence ? Why do we need only one concessive ?
    Can you please explain ?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    A concessive clause is a clause which begins with "although" or "even though" and which expresses an idea that suggests the opposite of the main part of the sentence.
    The sentence "Although he's quiet, he's not shy" begins with a concessive clause- "Although he's quiet " which has an opposite meaning of - "he's not shy" which is the main part of the sentence. (myenglishpages.com)
    I think it's because the logic of the sentence is lost. We have the main statement, which, in the given case, could be either "he is my brother" or "he does not resemble me" (it doesn't matter which), and then we introduce a concession that suggests the opposite of the main statement. If we have two concessive adverbs or conjunctions ("although"/"though" ..... "but"/"yet" ....) in the same sentence, we effectively have no main statement. We have two clauses suggesting the opposite of what?
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    I think it's because the logic of the sentence is lost. We have the main statement, which, in the given case, could be either "he is my brother" or "he does not resemble me" (it doesn't matter which), and then we introduce a concession that suggests the opposite of the main statement. If we have two concessive adverbs or conjunctions ("although"/"though" ..... "but"/"yet" ....) in the same sentence, we effectively have no main statement. We have two clauses suggesting the opposite of what?
    Thank you again sir..
    Does "yet" and "but" have the same meaning here ? If so , can you explain with an example ?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Yes, "yet" and "but" have the same ("contrary-to-expectation") meaning in your sentence; other synonyms that could be used here are "however", "nevertheless" and "nonetheless"
    yet
    8. though; still; nevertheless:
    The essay is good, yet it could be improved. (WR)
    He is my brother, yet / but / however / nevertheless / nonetheless he doesn't resemble me.

    "But" (see the Ngram) is used more commonly than "yet" in this sense. "Yet" is more formal/lterary.
     

    HajiSahib

    Banned
    Punjabi/Urdu - Pakistan
    Yes, "yet" and "but" have the same ("contrary-to-expectation") meaning in your sentence; other synonyms that could be used here are "however", "nevertheless" and "nonetheless"

    He is my brother, yet / but / however / nevertheless / nonetheless he doesn't resemble me.

    "But" (see the Ngram) is used more commonly than "yet" in this sense. "Yet" is more formal/lterary.
    Thank you sir for your kindness.
    I have one more question.
    What about the use of "yet" in the following sentence ?
    Although he is poor yet happy.
    Or
    Although he is poor, yet happy.

    Should I also not need to use "yet" here ? i.e..
    Although he is poor, happy.
    Or
    Although he is poor happy.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Although he is poor yet happy. Although he is poor, yet happy.
    These are concessive clauses, not full sentences. They have no meaning on their own because "although" introduces a concession to a main statement, and we have no main statement. "Yet" in "yet happy" is not functioning syntactically as a conjunction, but as an adverb expressing contrast (the opposite of the main statement), with the same meaning as "but" or "nevertheless".
    Although he is poor yet happy. :confused: There is no main statement. What is "although" conceding or "suggesting the opposite" of?
    Although he is poor, he is happy. :tick: (We don't usually expect poor people to be happy. "Although" suggests the opposite of our expectation.)
    He is poor, yet happy. :tick: (We don't usually expect poor people to be happy. "Yet" suggests the opposite of our expectation.)
     
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