Although

joh2001smile

Senior Member
Chinese
This is from a book about think tanks.
Could anyone tell me where the turn of logic about the conjunction 'although' is?
Context:
Although some candidates have relied more heavily on think tanks than others,a clear pattern is emerging. When candidates need policy advice from seasoned policy experts,they are turning to these organizations with great regularity, and to the delight of many think tanks candidates appear willing to rely on them as they embark on the long and often difficult road to the White House.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    This is known in technical parlance as a nuisance sentence. Here it is with some substitutions -- although it still uses a lot of words to go around in a circle:

    Although some candidates have relied more heavily on think tanks than [other candidates], a clear pattern is emerging. When candidates need policy advice from seasoned policy experts, they are turning to [think tanks] with great regularity, and, to the delight of many think tanks, candidates appear willing to rely on [think tanks] as [the candidates] embark on the long and often difficult road to the White House.

    I'm guessing that the "although" turn of logic looks like this: (1) Although some candidates have relied on think tanks, now virtually all candidates running for the White House are turning to them. Or, (2) Although some candidates have relied on think tanks, candidates running for the White House are now turning to think tanks, rather than to other policy experts.

    (1) is the number of candidates using them. (2) is the source of policy expertise people are using. If I were guessing, I would guess that the source (2) is the stronger of the conclusions here.


    As I said, not a brilliant sentence... it is not surprising that you find it slightly baffling in terms of logic.
     
    Last edited:

    boyblue1

    New Member
    English
    It could have been written easier. The "although" is a preemptive warning about the rest of the sentence. The author is saying that what he is about to say is true of most candidates, but to a greater degree in some cases.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1. There is significant variation.
    2. There is a clear trend.

    To link the two sentences you need a concessive (e.g. although, but, nevertheless), because the fact that there is variation might make one think there wasn't a trend.
     

    joh2001smile

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    This is known in technical parlance as a nuisance sentence. Here it is with some substitutions -- although it still uses a lot of words to go around in a circle:

    Although some candidates have relied more heavily on think tanks than [other candidates], a clear pattern is emerging. When candidates need policy advice from seasoned policy experts, they are turning to [think tanks] with great regularity, and, to the delight of many think tanks, candidates appear willing to rely on [think tanks] as [the candidates] embark on the long and often difficult road to the White House.

    I'm guessing that the "although" turn of logic looks like this: (1) Although some candidates have relied on think tanks, now virtually all candidates running for the White House are turning to them. Or, (2) Although some candidates have relied on think tanks, candidates running for the White House are now turning to think tanks, rather than to other policy experts.

    (1) is the number of candidates using them. (2) is the source of policy expertise people are using. If I were guessing, I would guess that the source (2) is the stronger of the conclusions here.


    As I said, not a brilliant sentence... it is not surprising that you find it slightly baffling in terms of logic.
    Copyright,
    Clear explanation. To better represent 'more heavily on think tanks than others I used (2) but with a tinct of (1) : Although some candidates have relied on think tanks, virtually all candidates running for the White House are now turning to think tanks, rather than to other policy experts. Am I changing the direction of the source text unduly?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Copyright,
    Clear explanation. To better represent 'more heavily on think tanks than others I used (2) but with a tinct of (1) : Although some candidates have relied on think tanks, virtually all candidates running for the White House are now turning to think tanks, rather than to other policy experts. Am I changing the direction of the source text unduly?
    I think you still need some sort of comparison of candidates in the opening clause. And if I may suggest something: you might consider using "touch" (a slight but appreciable addition) rather than "tinct," although I understand the meaning. :)
     
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