Although

david_dv

Senior Member
Spanish
Is the grammar of "although" used with reduction correct?

Although having a lot of free-time, our children need it to diversify their boring lives; otherwise, they will encounter repercussions deserving investigation.

Thank you
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I would use 'despite' here: Despite having a lot of free time, ....
    Despite is a preposition, and can be followed by the noun phrase "having a lot of free time".

    Although is a conjunction, and I would use it to introduce a clause: Although they have a lot of free time ....
     

    david_dv

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Although is a conjunction, and I would use it to introduce a clause: Although they have a lot of free time ....
    Mine is the same thing:

    My original sentence:Although our children have a lot of free-time, they need it to diversify their boring lives; otherwise, they will encounter repercussions deserving investigation.

    Reduced one:Although having a lot of free-time, our children need it to diversify their boring lives; otherwise, they will encounter repercussions deserving investigation.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    To speak more directly, when you reduce it by substituting a gerund for a clause, you have changed the grammatical structure, and you have to change the introductory word. You need to use 'despite' rather than 'although.'

    At least you do in the variety of English I am familiar with.
     

    david_dv

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    So you mean:
    I need to say:
    Despite of having a lot of free-time, our children need it to diversify their boring lives; otherwise, they will encounter repercussions deserving investigation.?

    And similarly we need to say:

    Despite of giving us advantages, computers can have some side-effects as well.

    And "Although giving us advantages, computers can have some side-effects as well." is considered to be incorrect! Yes?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    You do not use "despite" with "of". "Despite" must go on its own without a preposition, as indicated by Cagey in post 2. You are probably confusing it with "in spite of".
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I use "Despite" without of.
    You could also say "In spite of" with the same meaning.

    Despite having a lot of free-time, our children ....

    In spite of having a lot of free-time, our children ....


    I wouldn't use either of these in the sentence about computers. The relationship between the two parts of the sentence is different from that in your first sentence. I would rewrite this:
    Although they give us advantages, computers ....
    As
    While giving us advantages, computers ....
    (If you want to discuss this sentence further, you should start a new thread. It introduces a different topic.)

    Added: Cross-posted with boozer.
     
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