Although

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
“Although he was strong, he couldn’t lift that heavy table.
Apart from “although”, can this sentence be written:
“So strong as he was, he couldn’t lift that heavy table.”
Thanks.
 
  • papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    Your sentence would work in certain situations, but without the "so".

    If first you describe how string he was, you can then follow with "strong as he was" to set up a contrast.

    Example:
    John went to the gym twice a day and could easily bench press 300 pounds. But strong as he was, he <still> could not lift that heavy table.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,
    “Although he was strong, he couldn’t lift that heavy table.
    Apart from “although”, can this sentence be written:
    “So strong as he was, he couldn’t lift that heavy table.”
    Thanks.
    Mimi, some would argue that this is wrong (I would say "As strong as he was...") but others would say that it's perfectly acceptable to say "So". In this phraseology, I would think that most AE speakers would use the word "As". However, to avoid that argument altogether, you could also say:

    "Strong as he was, he couldn't lift that heavy table."
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Mimi, some would argue that this is wrong (I would say "As strong as he was...") but others would say that it's perfectly acceptable to say "So". In this phraseology, I would think that most AE speakers would use the word "As". However, to avoid that argument altogether, you could also say:

    "Strong as he was, he couldn't lift that heavy table."
    We covered the mater of "as" vs. "so" in another thread. Since that time time I have read "so" in this context in the text of at least two fine British writers. :)

    In my opinion "“So strong as he was, he couldn’t lift that heavy table” is correct, but to avoid being stoned by people who accept only one solution, many would prefer:

    “As strong as he was, he couldn’t lift that heavy table."

    Your solution avoids the problem, which is elegant. ;)

    ("Strong as he was, he couldn't lift that heavy table.")

    Gaer
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    We covered the mater of "as" vs. "so" in another thread. Since that time time I have read "so" in this context in the text of at least two fine British writers. :)

    In my opinion "“So strong as he was, he couldn’t lift that heavy table” is correct, but to avoid being stoned by people who accept only one solution, many would prefer:

    “As strong as he was, he couldn’t lift that heavy table."

    Your solution avoids the problem, which is elegant. ;)

    ("Strong as he was, he couldn't lift that heavy table.")

    Gaer
    I was involved in that previous thread discussion, Gaer, hence my qualification (and copout) to Mimi!:)
     

    mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    I was involved in that previous thread discussion, Gaer, hence my qualification (and copout) to Mimi!:)
    Hi, Dimcl.
    I don't understand what you mean:
    "my qualification (and copout) to Mimi."
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi, Dimcl.
    I don't understand what you mean:
    "my qualification (and copout) to Mimi."
    I "qualified" my answer, Mimi, by stating that I would use "as" but by also advising that others would use "so". If you and I were arguing about the colour of a flower, you might say "It's red" and I might say "No, it's orange". But after taking another look, I might "qualify" my answer by saying "Well, okay, I guess it's sort of red".

    "Copout" (or cop-out), according to Dicitionary.com is: "A failure to fulfill a commitment or responsibility or to face a difficulty squarely". Accordingly, my suggestion that you use neither "as" or "so" might be construed as a cop-out.:)
     
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