altogether

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
In saying "six dollars altogether" what is the role of altogether?Is it verb,adverb,or something else?
 
  • hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The sentence was a part of conversation-a shoping conversation. One speaker says "Here you are ... Six marks altogether".
    Now is it clear enough?
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    In that sentence, "altogether" has meaning #3 = used to show that you are referring to the total amount.
    Thank you. But the meaning #4 suits as well, doesn't it? How can I recognize the meaning? They sometimes are too similar and are interchangeable (at least to my mind).
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    But the meaning #4 suits as well, doesn't it? How can I recognize the meaning? They sometimes are too similar and are interchangeable (at least to my mind).
    The meaning they give as #4 = used to make a final statement about several things you have just mentioned [= all in all].
    The example given for that is: Lots of sunshine, wonderful food, and amazing nightlife - altogether a great vacation

    So the difference is that in your sentence, you're only talking about chairs (ten more making a total of ninety), not several different things.
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    The meaning they give as #4 = used to make a final statement about several things you have just mentioned [= all in all].
    The example given for that is: Lots of sunshine, wonderful food, and amazing nightlife - altogether a great vacation

    So the difference is that in your sentence, you're only talking about chairs (ten more making a total of ninety), not several different things.
    Thank you so much, I got it now. And now it made me to come up with another question which is: what does ''total'' mean here? Let me ask in another way: What if we exclude ''altogether''?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    And now it made me to come up with another question which is: what does ''total'' mean here? Let me ask in another way: What if we exclude ''altogether''?
    Here, "altogether" is being used as synonymous with "a total of". So your sentence could say either:
    If we can find another ten chairs, that will make it 90 altogether.
    If we can find another ten chairs, that will make it a total of 90.
    They mean the same.
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    Here, "altogether" is being used as synonymous with "a total of". So your sentence could say either:
    If we can find another ten chairs, that will make it 90 altogether.
    If we can find another ten chairs, that will make it a total of 90.
    They mean the same.
    Thanks. And what if we cross out ''a total of'' and ''altogether''? Can't we just say ''that will make it 90''?
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Would "in total " sound fine to you as an alternative to "altogether "?

    If we can find another ten chairs, that will make it 90 in total.
     
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