altrimenti si sommerebbe alle sue preoccupazioni

Peppe77

Senior Member
Italian
Meglio non dirglielo altrimenti si aggiungerebbe/sommerebbe alle sue preoccupazioni che sono già abbastanza.
My attempt:

Better not to say it to him otherwise it would add up/sum to his worries that are already enough.
 
  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I think there's nothing wrong with Fitter's suggestion. Tell him is much better than say to him. Another way might be

    Better not say anything. He already has so many/enough worries this would only add to them.
     

    Peppe77

    Senior Member
    Italian
    ok thank you. Just to understand better, if I would say (following fitter's post):

    Better not to tell him, it would add to his worries that are just enough.

    Would be wrong?
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    ok thank you. Just to understand better, if I would say (following fitter's post):
    Better not to tell him, it would add to his worries that are just enough.
    Would be wrong?
    No, sorry, it is a little strange. It sounds like he is happy with his worries, he has just enough to keep him going.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    One more thing "better not to tell him" and "better not tell him" are both correct but the second one, more idiomatic, in my opinion, is the better one here. The first one is short for "It is better not to tell him." This states an opinion. The second one is an imperative something like "Don't tell him. It'll be better that way."
     

    Peppe77

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Se invece volessi dire (la parte tra parentesi vuole avere un tono scherzoso, umoristico):

    Sono una persona che non si arrende mai (meglio non chiamarla testardaggine; si aggiungerebbe ai miei difetti che sono già abbastanza)

    I'm a person who never gives up (better not to call it "stubbornness"; it would just add to my weaknesses and I already have enough of them)

    potrebbe funzionare qui?
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    I would say flaws rather than weaknesses and change it just a little bit, more stylistic than grammatical.
    I'm a person who never gives up (don't call it "stubborness"; that would just be adding to my flaws and I already have enough)

    Sorry just wanted to say that Better not to call it "stubborness" is ok, though! :)
     
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