always on the other side of knowledge, always on the outside looking in

nazishahbazi

Member
Persian
Hi
could someone please tell me the meaning of the sentence "always on the other side of knowledge, always on the outside looking in"in the text below?

In World’s Fair, we see a young boy—always on the other side of knowledge, always on the outside looking in—come into knowledge at the 1939 World’s Fair.

Thanks
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Please note that you’re supposed to tell us the source of your quote, and to explain properly what the context is. Here, World’s Fair – which should be in italics – is the title of a Doctorow novel, and the text is from this book: The End of Dissatisfaction?.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Obliged!

    1. "To be on the outside looking in" - This is a metaphor for being a spectator/observer of an activity rather than taking part in it - the metaphor also implies a feeling of isolation in the spectator/observer.

    2. always on the other side of knowledge, - This is best understood in terms of 1. The writer implies knowledge has two sides: on one side are those who discover knowledge, and on the other side there are those who merely see the results of knowledge.
     

    nazishahbazi

    Member
    Persian
    Obliged!

    1. "To be on the outside looking in" - This is a metaphor for being a spectator/observer of an activity rather than taking part in it - the metaphor also implies a feeling of isolation in the spectator/observer.

    2. always on the other side of knowledge, - This is best understood in terms of 1. The writer implies knowledge has two sides: on one side are those who discover knowledge, and on the other side there are those who merely see the results of knowledge.
    Thank you so much. It helped :)
     
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