alzar el bebé

minda10

Member
Spanish/Rio de la Plata/Spain
Please , I know hold would be appropriate for the sentece but I would like to use a more literary word if possible.
Original sentence in Spanish

La partera alzó al recien nacido en brazos y lo acercó al lecho.

The midwife held up the baby in her arms and went up to the bed.

Can you give any options to the verb or the sentence?
Thanks! You are all very helpful
 
  • rogster01

    Senior Member
    English UK
    A more literary version...you could perhaps say 'The midwife gathered up the newborn in her arms and brought it over to the bed..

    'Gathered' would normally have a sense of 'more than one thing' but i think it is valid here as it can convey a sense of picking up the baby bundled up in its soft blankets or whatever...
    I suggest newborn as a good alternative to baby also, literal translation.

    you could also just say lifted up the baby, or picked up if you prefer
     

    dunc88

    Member
    English - Australia
    The midwife raised the newborn in her arms and placed him/her/it into the bed.
    I can't think of a good translation for 'lo acercó'
     

    minda10

    Member
    Spanish/Rio de la Plata/Spain
    thanks dunc88. I like your sentence very much but the idea is not placing the baby into the bed but "acercarlo", go up to the mother's bed and then, put the baby in his mother's breast.
    If you think there could be a better verb than "went up" you are very welcome!
     

    gotitadeleche

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. English
    A more literary version...you could perhaps say 'The midwife gathered up the newborn in her arms and brought it over to the bed..

    'Gathered' would normally have a sense of 'more than one thing' but i think it is valid here as it can convey a sense of picking up the baby bundled up in its soft blankets or whatever...
    I suggest newborn as a good alternative to baby also, literal translation.

    you could also just say lifted up the baby, or picked up if you prefer
    I agree with rogster's version. It sounds more natural and literary than the other suggestions in my opinion.

    If you think there could be a better verb than "went up" you are very welcome!
    Rogster's use of "brought it over" is good. You could also say "carried/took it over."
     
    Last edited:

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If the baby has just been born 'this instant' then the midwife "....brought it round to the side of the bed."

    If the child was in an incubator, for example, "...brought it over..." is better.

    The point is that if the midwife was standing at the foot of the bed, 'brought it over' doesn't work.

    syd
     

    minda10

    Member
    Spanish/Rio de la Plata/Spain
    We know the midwife has just finished cleaning and dressing up the baby, then the midwife raised the newborn in her arms and brought/ carried it over/ round to the side of the bed.
    Still wonder if the baby is "it"? Why? Grammar? Usage?
    I like both options in negritta.
    What do you think?
     

    SydLexia

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If the midwife has just finished dressing the baby then 'carried it over' is fine.

    The context I was imagining is one where the midwife takes the baby as soon as it is born and puts in directly on the mother's chest (so that he/she can hear the mother's heart: this is supposed to relieve stress). In this scenario 'brought it over' doesn't work as it implies from A to B with a space between the two.

    I would say the baby is 'it' for pragmatic reasons. See the unfortunate alternative I have used above.

    syd
     
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