Am I being rude? [requesting reservations by email]

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markwolk

Member
Polish, New Zealand
My main languages are French and Polish, yet I have been speaking English every day for the last 12 years, as I live in New Zealand.

Some time ago, I booked a small luxury hotel in an English speaking country. Later, I wrote to that hotel to also book a table for lunch there:
Hi (first name),

On the 16 January, we will arrive at (town).

I will take delivery of a rental car, and (...) we will first all drive to (your hotel) to have lunch and settle in (our room).

Please be ready for lunch for all of us (5 persons) at 12:30-1:00pm. I will pay for this separately.

(...)Awaiting your confirmation.

With thanks,

Kind regards,
And their reply was:
Recieved your email re lunch, I should just like to say, we dont mind assisting, but the tone of your email is almost a demand, regarding lunch (...), will be fine, it is likely we will have other guests in house for lunch and your table will be available at the appropriate time.

In future please, our relations can be enhanced with a request not a demand, without further enhancing, I shall leave it there.
Huh? :confused: Was my email so rude???
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I can see where he was coming from:
    I will take delivery of a rental car, and (...) we will first all drive to (your hotel) to have lunch - whether you like it or not - and settle in (our room).

    Please be ready for lunch for all of us - because it's going to happen - (5 persons) at 12:30-1:00pm. I will pay for this separately.
    The parts in red are the problematic parts. The parts in blue are what they can be assumed to mean (although I know you did not mean them this way).

    Suggestion for the future:

    I would like to ask whether it would be possible to make a reservation for lunch at your hotel for 5 people from 12:30 to 1:00.

    Please let me know if you can accommodate us. I look forward to your reply.

    Regards,

    Basically, avoid the word "will" at any cost! ;)
     

    markwolk

    Member
    Polish, New Zealand
    Great, thanks. As I wrote to my correspondent later:
    Sorry about the tone of my email re lunch. I should probably have added "if possible" when asking for lunch. Please understand than I am a native Polish speaker, and my main language is still French, since I spent 25 years in Geneva. I believe this kind of misunderstandings do occur due to subtle differences between languages. I.e. the word "demand" in English does not quite have the same meaning as "demande" in French (which is a polite request), so it took me some time to figure out why the English-speaking waiters from whom I "demanded some salt" were grumbling and whispering, whereas it is perfectly OK to "demander" some salt from a French waiter! I'd bet several wars started on issues like this one!
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    I can't believe the personal affront and tone of the response to the business like business letter you sent to a business to conduct business.
    I would suggest a different hotel but as that is probably not an option I would suggest caution when dealing with the person who wrote this odd reply to you.
    I think that your e-mail was perfectly respectful.
    Edit:
    I think that your response is perfect.

    .,,
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I have to say that I would find your initial communication to sound very demanding if you had sent it to me. There is no option for the hotel to say, "I'm sorry... we're already booked for lunch." The result is that it sounds like you expect them to do whatever they have to do - including kicking other people out - in order to accommodate your party of five.

    I certainly understand, after your explanation, and that it was a misunderstanding, but I do think there is justification for the reaction.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    I have to say that I would find your initial communication to sound very demanding if you had sent it to me. There is no option for the hotel to say, "I'm sorry... we're already booked for lunch." The result is that it sounds like you expect them to do whatever they have to do - including kicking other people out - in order to accommodate your party of five.

    I certainly understand, after your explanation, and that it was a misunderstanding, but I do think there is justification for the reaction.
    If it was a personal email, I would agree with you 100%. However, his email had a tone of business about it and under no circumstances should it have been replied to like it was. Very rude on their part.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If it was a personal email, I would agree with you 100%. However, his email had a tone of business about it and under no circumstances should it have been replied to like it was. Very rude on their part.
    I'd say it had a tone all right. ;)

    When arranging for lunch or accommodations, it is a negotation, not a dictation of conditions and expectations. That should be reflected in the text of the communication.
     

    Anna980

    New Member
    English, New Zealand
    I still think their reply was a bit bizarre - especially considering the fact that they are a hotel and therefore must continuously deal with people who speak much worse English than that!
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    The reply was very unusual, but your English is so good that I imagine that the felt they were corresponding with a native-speaker. It is not so much that you said anything wrong, it is the things which you left out, but which a native-speaker would have included, which makes the email stand out.

    I would suggest looking for a different hotel - and being a bit more 'negotiative' in future. Why both? Because the hotel ought to be used to dealing with non-native-speakers, and a clearly understandable booking should not have elicited the response you got. A quiet word with you upon arrival should have sufficed - when a manager would have had a chance to assess your level of mastery of English.
     

    Trina

    Senior Member
    Australia (English)
    Great, thanks. As I wrote to my correspondent later:
    I'm sure this made them squirm!

    Out of context, your original email could sound a little demanding. However, the recipients are in the hotel industry and should know better. Good business sense surely would be to adopt the "let's wait and see" or "let's not be too hasty to judge".

    We're probably all guilty of jumping to the wrong conclusion at some time or other and this thread is a good reminder to us all to wait until all the facts are in before we act.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    I'm sure this made them squirm!

    Out of context, your original email could sound a little demanding. However, the recipients are in the hotel industry and should know better. Good business sense surely would be to adopt the "let's wait and see" or "let's not be too hasty to judge".

    We're probably all guilty of jumping to the wrong conclusion at some time or other and this thread is a good reminder to us all to wait until all the facts are in before we act.
    Well said!
     

    KaRiNe_Fr

    Senior Member
    Français, French - France
    Thanks Markwolk, this thread is really helpful for me too! Is it a French thing? :p I already experimented "dry" replies from my business relations as I surely have been seen as a rude woman demanding into my emails instead of requesting. This was because of my lack of English language skills of course. I'm always astonished receiving such emails. Now I'm adding some "would you mind" everywhere, even when things have to be done and there would be no way they didn't want to do them. Our relations are more peaceful now. :)
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I already experimented "dry" replies from my business relations...
    What a fortuitous example of differences between French and English! Experience is not quite as false a friend as demander, but it has led you astray here.

    We use experiment for tests such as those conducted in scientific laboratories. But in the sense you are using the word, experience is correct in English. You've experienced "dry" replies!

    In a way, it's the same situation as demander, but in reverse.
    .
    .
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    The hotel has actually done Markwolk good turn by helping him understand the cultural norms of his intended destination. When in Rome, and all that.
    A spoonfull of honey catches more flies than a bucket of vinegar.
    I think the email from the hotel was somewhat rude. Most likely the person who wrote it was either having a bad day or is used to "one-upping" people.

    Markwolk's email sounded "foreign" to me. There are several words he used that made me think immediately that English is not his first language.

    I think the "hotel-guy" (or woman) was looking for a fight.
    The American attitude is that if a customer is paying, then the person providing the service must adopt a servile and subservient role.
    [slight exaggeration]:D
    The "American attitude" is also that in a country the deals with an incredible number of people who do not speak English as their first language it is unwise to take offense without first ASKING for clarification.

    The hotel did not do this.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    I think there is something to be said for a business that values its customers. However, Clerks is one of my favorite movies ever. When working, I do not respect customers who make an effort to disrespect me, but as I am asking them for their business, it should be my duty to extend the bridge of respect first if they are neutral. Also, the hotel industry is full of competition...their reply email was just bad business sense.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I think there is something to be said for a business that values its customers. However, Clerks is one of my favorite movies ever. When working, I do not respect customers who make an effort to disrespect me, but as I am asking them for their business, it should be my duty to extend the bridge of respect first if they are neutral. Also, the hotel industry is full of competition...their reply email was just bad business sense.
    I could not agree more. It would have been a simple matter to ask the intention of the emailer, and the reply could have been written more quickly. :)
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Thanks Markwolk, this thread is really helpful for me too! Is it a French thing? :p I already experimented "dry" replies from my business relations as I surely have been seen as a rude woman demanding into my emails instead of requesting. This was because of my lack of English language skills of course. I'm always astonished receiving such emails. Now I'm adding some "would you mind" everywhere, even when things have to be done and there would be no way they didn't want to do them. Our relations are more peaceful now. :)
    I experienced something like this last year. I corresponded with a French woman for a few months but it didn't work out for a number of reasons. Now that I think of it I do remember being struck by the precision of her writing. The writing was very formal and full of punctuation points! I am not used to the use of punctuation points and I found the tone that they gave was snippy and I found that I began to look for criticism where there probably was not any negativity present.
    Her command of English was quite excellent and I think that this confused me because I thought that she intentionally constructed sentences finishing in punctuation points but this is not the case. Is it possible that French has a different approach to communication and is less circumspect at times than is English?

    .,,
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    When working, I do not respect customers who make an effort to disrespect me,
    I used to be a branch manager for the Irish arm of Blockbuster video.
    If you knew what the staff thought about many of our customers you'd be very polite to them.
    Ever had an overdue fee which the staff refused to negotiate downwards?
    — Maybe they didn't like your attitude the last time you were in!

    Ever had a fee you really did owe wiped off without even asking for it?
    — Maybe you've got a friend for life there ;)
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    I used to be a branch manager for the Irish arm of Blockbuster video.
    If you knew what the staff thought about many of our customers you'd be very polite to them.
    Ever had an overdue fee which the staff refused to negotiate downwards?
    — Maybe they didn't like your attitude the last time you were in!

    Ever had a fee you really did owe wiped off without even asking for it?
    — Maybe you've got a friend for life there ;)
    hehehe.... This is something similar to my experience on reception desk in a hotel...

    A nice smile and a pleasant word made me do impossible to make guests feel better, even if they didn't ask for it.
    A nasty attitude trying to give me a hard time only because he does not like his room, always resulted in my big smile and: "I am soo sorry, but this is the only room we have. Tha hotel is completely booked during the whole month and I simply cannot change you the room you don't like." Even if a hotel has half booked capacities.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I experienced something like this last year. I corresponded with a French woman for a few months but it didn't work out for a number of reasons. Now that I think of it I do remember being struck by the precision of her writing. The writing was very formal and full of punctuation points! I am not used to the use of punctuation points and I found the tone that they gave was snippy and I found that I began to look for criticism where there probably was not any negativity present.
    Her command of English was quite excellent and I think that this confused me because I thought that she intentionally constructed sentences finishing in punctuation points but this is not the case. Is it possible that French has a different approach to communication and is less circumspect at times than is English?

    .,,
    Let me share my own experience. I read no language other than English except German. For this reason I am able to "feel" the "tone" of an email or letter sent to me in both German and English.

    It's different. Even people in Germany who write English very well sound more relaxed in German. Much of the humor seems to disappear in English.

    To experience this, you have to try to write in another language to someone who does not understand English. It is hard.

    Sometimes people who use English as a second language are really rude. There are rude people everywhere.

    But I think it pays to be very careful before making the judgement that the feeling of rudeness is coming from the person and not from unease with our language.

    This is why I always "cut people slack" when they are writing to me in MY language when it is obviously not their language. :)

    That to me is the point.

    Look at this:

    Please be ready for lunch for all of us (5 persons) at 12:30-1:00pm. I will pay for this separately.
    In other languages different words and structures are used to "soften" requests. In my opinion the person who received this email (the hotel employee) and assumed it was a rude statement from a native speaker was looking for a fight.

    On the other hand, if he (or she) had had a very bad day, I think the reaction is understandable—although not good for business. :)
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    In my opinion the person who received this email (the hotel employee) and assumed it was a rude statement from a native speaker was looking for a fight.

    On the other hand, if he (or she) had had a very bad day, I think the reaction is understandable—although not good for business. :)
    I think that no matter how rude the request was/is, an employee simply cannot answer in a way they answered. I find it very unusual, I can dare to say, rather astonishing. You can show to a client that you don't like his attitude in many ways, but not in this way. Even if the clerk has the worst day of his life, if I were his boss, and get to know about this answer, I would have a serious thought about firing him/her. As you said, it is very BAD, BAD business. And it is NOT about American way and "the customer is always right". Not at all. The example that Maxiogee gave is a perfect one on how an employee can give a hard time to a client without client being aware that he is given a hard time.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I don't understand what is so horrific in the email reply from the hotel. The two snippets that are at all controversial are:

    "but the tone of your email is almost a demand,"

    and

    "our relations can be enhanced with a request not a demand,"


    This is worth firing someone over?
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    I don't understand what is so horrific in the email reply from the hotel. The two snippets that are at all controversial are:

    "but the tone of your email is almost a demand,"

    and

    "our relations can be enhanced with a request not a demand,"


    This is worth firing someone over?
    Not firing, in my opinion, but certainly a strong rebuke.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Not firing, in my opinion, but certainly a strong rebuke.
    Interesting. Perhaps it is a difference in preferences.

    I would rather have someone tell me, "What you're saying is sounding very rude" rather than do the passive-aggressive thing and declare my lunch table "unavailable" or make me wait until 5 p.m. to check in.

    The person accommodated everything that the customer desired when it would have been just as easy to invent some reason not to be helpful and not try to clear up the communication.

    Personally, I'd much rather have someone serve me and at the same time let me know that I'm not communicating well than not tell me about my communication and not serve me.
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    Interesting. Perhaps it is a difference in preferences.

    I would rather have someone tell me, "What you're saying is sounding very rude" rather than do the passive-aggressive thing and declare my lunch table "unavailable" or make me wait until 5 p.m. to check in.

    The person accommodated everything that the customer desired when it would have been just as easy to invent some reason not to be helpful and not try to clear up the communication.

    Personally, I'd much rather have someone serve me and at the same time let me know that I'm not communicating well than not tell me about my communication and not serve me.
    I agree that the tone could be politely checked, but only if the hotel person knows he is a foreigner. The bit that still bothers me, however, is:

    "...our relations can be enhanced with a request not a demand."

    In my opinion, this is just rude.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I generally agree with James. I imagine the hotel guy as a nice guy who was taken aback by the perceived presumptuousness of the e-mail message. He clearly indicated his willingness and readiness to accommodate the request, adding a personal remark advising the customer to be a little more tactful next time. Maybe, just maybe, he was being frank instead of specious this time - fancy that! Furthermore, consider the fact that if he had not responded this way Markwolk would not have asked us about his e-mail and gotten feedback about the possibility of misunderstanding. Regardless of what has been said about the original e-mail's being strictly professional and all, it cannot be denied that there is reason to see it as forward, blunt, and demanding. In such correspondence, it is advisable to destroy - or at least decrease - the possibility of misinterpretation by choosing the most unambiguous and unobjectionable tone possible.
     

    ~Angel~

    Member
    Usa
    French and Englsih
    hmm.. intesresting!
    Happens to me .. all the time!
    I knew I wasn't alone.. but glad to hear it from other peeps!
    The inuendos that only a native-speaker would catch ..

    My first language is french.. and when I talk sarcastiscally to my hubby( qui est 'ricain' et ne parle pas un mot francais... lol ) or anyone else .. they don't get it,they just don't get the joke and think that I am dead serious.. nearly got a friend really mad last time..
    pffft:rolleyes:
     

    markwolk

    Member
    Polish, New Zealand
    The reply was very unusual, but your English is so good that I imagine that the felt they were corresponding with a native-speaker.
    Yeah; I'll remember next time to sprinkle a few mistakes here and there, so my English looks less perfect, and there are fewer misunderstandings. Quite typical of me to to be too close to perfection, yet not there. Thanks for all the comments here; quite useful! Ah yes; the person who replied to my mail was not an employee, contrarily to what some of you have assumed; he is the hotel's owner, I think. I assume he does not speak any other language than English and this was the main reason of the problem.
     

    shrek99

    New Member
    English Australia
    I think you hurt their feelings! It is more usual to request whether it is possible to make a reservation for a table of five at such and such a time. Your imperative ' Please be ready' ruined the friendship by inferring possible incompetence on their behalf. Having said that, the tourism industry that I have experienced in NZ is so wonderful that you may have been slightly off track for years and never known it.
     

    Anais Ninn

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Here are some quick and easy tips for your future reference.

    1. When you want to request something and you can't quickly think of a good(?) way to do so, try making it in a form of a question.

    example: Please be ready. => Could you get ready?/Would you be able to get ready?

    2. Choose would like to over will.

    example: We will have lunch there. => We would like to have lunch there.

    3. phrases like if possible, if it's ok, if you don't mind wouldn't hurt. :)

    Anais
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    The whole response from the hotel person (clerk or owner) sounds like PMS to me. Please, I'm not trying to tick off 50% of the population....

    ....It's like the joke,

    "Why does it take 4 women in a bathroom with PMS to change the light bulb?"

    --Because it just DOES, OK?!??
    :p
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The whole response from the hotel person (clerk or owner) sounds like PMS to me. Please, I'm not trying to tick off 50% of the population....

    ....It's like the joke,

    "Why does it take 4 women in a bathroom with PMS to change the light bulb?"

    --Because it just DOES, OK?!??
    :p
    Out of curiosity, how would you have responded?
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi (first name),

    On the 16 January, we will arrive at (town).

    I will take delivery of a rental car, and (...) we will first all drive to (your hotel) to have lunch and settle in (our room).

    Please be ready for lunch for all of us (5 persons) at 12:30-1:00pm. I will pay for this separately.

    (...)Awaiting your confirmation.

    With thanks,

    Kind regards,

    First, with all your "I will's," I would assume that English probably wasn't your first language. A native English speaker would have just said, "The five of us are due to arrive at...." With your ending of, "Kind regards," I would have also assumed that you were being cordial. I would have responded asking to clarify another assumption--that you were requesting a reservation for 12:30 at the restaurant.

    Dear Visitor,
    Thank you for making Our Hotel your choice while visiting Smalltown. You will also find that our restaurant will satisfy a variety of appetites and even has a special heart-conscious menu. I am assuming you are requesting a reservation in the restaurant for 12:30--as opposed to eating in the adjoining rooms with the lanai overlooking the swimming pool. Please advise the desk upon checking in if room service is your preference. Otherwise, we will assume that it is a reservation to dine in our fine restaurant.
    Again, thank you for choosing Our Hotel. We are looking forward to serving you!
    Cordially,
    John Doe
    Hotel Clerk, Manager and Owner
    Our Hotel

    I don't think the respondent should have chastized you for your tone--although it seemed a bit brusque. If you are in business--especially in a business where you meet people from all corners of the world and all walks, you have to suppose that some of them will have a different tone....

    ....Even some moderators have seemed brusque in chastizing people for posting in wrong places, or for whatever. You learn that different people communicate differently--and might not even be meaning to sound rude or brusque. But if you're in the HOTEL business, you should even be more aware of that!

    An eye-opener for all of us!
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    I don't think the respondent should have chastized you for your tone--although it seemed a bit brusque. If you are in business--especially in a business where you meet people from all corners of the world and all walks, you have to suppose that some of them will have a different tone....
    That was my point. If the response was written by the owner of the hotel, I would assume he (or she) knows very little about international communciation!
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    I just want to say I agree with mjscott a 100%, and now knowing that the answer was written by the owner, even more. How little he/she knows about the business and communication. If he expects of all his guests to speak as he imagines, then he will have very few guests.

    Once I worked at organizing an Orthodontic congress, and I was receiving a lot of emails from doctors who asked my help to get a reservation in the hotel which was the venue of the congress. It WAS NOT my job, but I received many emails like: I want a room in XXX hotel. Signed. Dr. XXX" "Please arrange me the room", "A room please" , etc. Very short and demanding emails. So, according to this owner, I should have answered, "you are so unpolite and demanding, so go to hell and book your room yourself!" No. I did not. I contacted the agency who did it and made all those reservations. I repeat, it was not my job, nevertheless, I did it.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    So, according to this owner, I should have answered, "you are so unpolite and demanding, so go to hell and book your room yourself!" No. I did not. I contacted the agency who did it and made all those reservations. I repeat, it was not my job, nevertheless, I did it.
    This seems like a gross exaggeration of the response received. I can understand that we would like to have all communications be totally understanding and executed with perfect equanimity, but everyone has their days.

    However, the owner didn't say, "go to hell". He didn't refuse any one of the demands. He didn't say, "I won't do this until you say it nicely."

    It was good of you to handle the demanding emails the way that you did. It would be great if all people in the hospitality industry were as polite as you were in that instance. I think a little of that patience you showed with the orthodontists could be spared for the hotel owner as well.

    Misunderstandings happen. Sometimes it's cultural, sometimes it's something else. I don't understand why the guest should receive all possible latitude in his communication and the hotel owner none. Perhaps it's just a difference of opinion.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    I don't understand why the guest should receive all possible latitude in his communication and the hotel owner none. Perhaps it's just a difference of opinion.
    Yes, I admit, I exagerate but on purpose. I guess it's cultural thing with Serbs, when we talk about something we like to exagerate in order to give better impression of/about something.:D

    Of course the guest cannot say whatever he wants, but I still think that this kind of "preaching on good behavior" should be done only in extreme cases, and I think that the case of the starter of this thread wasn't the case of extreme rudness. By extreme cases I consider a person who openly insults or behaves in extremely inapropirate way. It's just my opinion and my conclusion was drawn from a little of experience in hospitality industry I have. It is BAD business to try to correct the behavior or the way of thinking of your guests. There are many other ways to show him you don't agree with his behavior.

    It would be great if all people in the hospitality industry were as polite as you were in that instance.
    I will tell you one little incident while I was working in a reception of a hotel.
    We had a group of 25 young English vaterpolo or something like that players (I don't remeber exactly right now). All guys of the age between 18 to 25. The first night they came, they spent all night in the hotel bar which was next to the reception, drinking beer. The bar was a little one, and it was not supposed to be all night full, it was rather supposed to be a place where you can wait for your friend/spouse/whatever while they are in their rooms, or to have a quick coffee or drink before going out, therefore there was not a waiter, but the bellboy was supposed to serve drinks. But whith 20 of them there during all night, the bellboy was only serving them, and he couldn't atteng properly other guests that were coming to check in, my cash box soon was left without any change, and as the night was going by, they were each time louder, and as much as I asked them politely to low down their voices, they didn't pay any attention to me.
    These orgies repeated each night during three days, and I was not the only receptionist affected by their unconsiderable behavior. The third day I just said with a polite smile that we have ran out of beer and I ran out of change, and that I am really sorry. Of course, it was a notorious lie, but this was the only way to get them out of the hotel and to get some sleep for other guests.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Of course, it was a notorious lie, but this was the only way to get them out of the hotel and to get some sleep for other guests.
    A notorious lie...
    What a wonderfully evocative phrase.
    I have not seen this construction before but I instantly understood your meaning.
    You were lying and they knew you knew they knew.

    .,,
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    A notorious lie...
    What a wonderfully evocative phrase.
    I have not seen this construction before but I instantly understood your meaning.
    You were lying and they knew you knew they knew.

    .,,
    Ups. It seems I made a literal translation from Serbian...:eek: So, this construction does not exist in English????
    By the way, it also means a gross lie and shameless, too, since we had more beer and I still had change. But they were too noisy, and I already had some complaints from other guests, so this was the only thing I could do in order to have "wolfs full and all sheep alive" :) (another literal translation meaning to have all parties happy)...
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Ups. It seems I made a literal translation from Serbian...:eek: So, this construction does not exist in English????
    "Notorious lie" does exist, but in general I believe you would be safest to use this term for a "famous lie".

    You might have meant "obvious lie", but I think we all got your point!

    Sometimes there are people who are incapable of understanding facts. If I have tried to be honest in the past and have been rewarded for it by being treated rudely, I have NO problem lying in the future to avoid unpleasantness. :)
    By the way, it also means a gross lie and shameless, too, since we had more beer and I still had change. But they were too noisy, and I already had some complaints from other guests, so this was the only thing I could do in order to have "wolfs full and all sheep alive" :) (another literal translation meaning to have all parties happy)...
    I like "shameless lie"! It's so much more colorful than "obvious". Gross and shameless? One possibility: "egregious lie".

    I do think that you or any other person who is providing any kind of service has the right to be a nasty as any customer, but it is also true that "venting" is not a very good way to make money.
    I don't understand why the guest should receive all possible latitude in his communication and the hotel owner none. Perhaps it's just a difference of opinion.
    I don't think it has a thing to do with opinion. It has to do with making money. At what point do you say, to quote a line from an old movie (Network), "I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!"

    In my business I should never lose my temper at a student either. It's bad business. Sometimes, however, bad business is good for my stomach and allows me to avoid a migraine. ;)
     

    Dust!

    Member
    Italy
    Hi everyone.
    I'm a owner of two hotels and I've to admit that an email like that one [the first one of this topic] would make me behave and reply in the same way of that owner.
    its tone sounds like if I must do all he asks.
    it is business, it is true, but I've also the right to choose right customers.
    it is me who is selling after all.
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Hi everyone.
    I'm a owner of two hotels and I've to admit that an email like that one [the first one of this topic] would make me behave and reply in the same way of that owner.
    its tone sounds like if I must do all he asks.
    it is business, it is true, but I've also the right to choose right customers.
    it is me who is selling after all.
    And what would you do if one of your staff responded to the same letter in the same way? I assume this owner saw this e-mail accidentally, since I suppose owners have other things to do. As far as I remember, the owner of the hotel where I worked wasn't exactly checking emails, and serving guests on the phone or at the reception...
     

    Dust!

    Member
    Italy
    I'm still at reception at this moment.
    It is a little hotel, that's also right.

    If I had to say the truth, I've never get an email written like that one. And if a staff comes to me saying 'there is a customer who wants this, this and this other one thing and I've just booked him a room' I probably wont confirm that staff for the next year.
    And I also think that if a staff get an email like that one, before replying, he surely ask to the owner. Surely.

    I hope to have been polite. if you set me right about english I'll appreciate it
     
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