Am I the master here, or you? Go to.

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  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Today we would say Get on with it!

    The OED explains this meaning of go to like this:
    1a To go about one's work; to set to work, begin working. Chiefly imper., as an exhortation to do this... Now arch. (somewhat rare).
     
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    nkaper

    Senior Member
    russian
    Thanks. But what about its translation? Does "What the" have to do with "Get on with it!" ?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Another explanation of “go to”, from Merriam-Webster:

    archaic — used interjectionally to express disapproval or disbelief
    go to, go to; you have known what you should not — William Shakespeare


    Presumably the No Fear explanation implies “What the [Devil]!” (maybe meaning How dare you contradict me!). But when Capulet says it again a little further on, suddenly they say it means “Go on, go on”.
     
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