amari ki ga susumanakute ne

Campers

New Member
England
In this dialogue:

A: Raigetsu no shain ryokou irassharanai n' desu ka?
B: Ikanai to iu wake de wa nai n' da ga, amari ki ga susumanakute ne

Can anyone explain why the final verb is te-form?
 
  • rukiak

    Senior Member
    japanese
    Hello.
    In this dialogue:

    A: Raigetsu no shain ryokou irassharanai n' desu ka?
    B: Ikanai to iu wake de wa nai n' da ga, amari ki ga susumanakute ne

    Can anyone explain why the final verb is te-form?
    It is used to describe the reason.

    If you have more problem about this, pls ask the detail.
     

    Campers

    New Member
    England
    As I understand it the te form is used to join clauses (or verbs to their auxiliaries, as in tabeteiru etc.). But here nothing is being joined on. So why not use 'susumanai ne'?
     

    rukiak

    Senior Member
    japanese
    te form means "reason" occasionally.

    You can say 'amari ki ga susumanai ne',alternatively.
    It just describe your feeling.

    But 'amari ki ga susumanakute ne' has "te form" so it means reason, and this form, ending with te-form of reason, express apologetic feeling, so often spoken with apologetic intonation.
    ( I don't know the technical grammer or derivation, but I guess ending with te-form is derived from the abbreviation of series of conjunction which is used by the interrogee to explain reasons or situation.)
    But here nothing is being joined on.
    So some explanations maybe silently joined on but they aren't spoken, because profuse explanation is not good (in many situations in Japan).
    Or by ending with te form ,you may imply the exist of many explanation, it makes no difference if you really have reasonable ones or not, because it is abbreviated.
     
    Last edited:

    lrosa

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    But 'amari ki ga susumanakute ne' has "te form" so it means reason, and this form, ending with te-form of reason, express apologetic feeling, so often spoken with apologetic intonation.
    ( I don't know the technical grammer or derivation, but I guess ending with te-form is derived from the abbreviation of series of conjunction which is used by the interrogee to explain reasons or situation.)

    So some explanations maybe silently joined on but they aren't spoken, because profuse explanation is not good (in many situations in Japan).
    Or by ending with te form ,you may imply the exist of many explanation, it makes no difference if you really have reasonable ones or not, because it is abbreviated.
    This is a good explanation. There are a lot of cases in Japanese where phrases are abbreviated for politeness' sake. For example, if someone presents a dish that you cannot eat, a simple ちょっと (chotto), accompanied by apologetic body language and tone of voice, can convey the message that there is no way you can eat that food.

    The case of the te-form in your example is somewhat similar. Finishing the sentence with the te-form and "ね" softens the negative response. The person speaking clearly does not want to say outright "I don't want to go and I will not go".

    As I understand it, the te-form here is equivalent to finishing clauses with し (shi), except that it is far politer. I think that saying あまり気が進まないし (amari ki ga sumanai shi) would come across as blunt, while the te-form can be used even alongside polite speech.

    So as Rukiak points out, you can look at this te-form as being used to join clauses, except that the second clause is omitted.
     
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