[AmE pronunciation] sawli for salty?

zagzam

New Member
korean
Hello everyone!

I'm reading this book that I bought yesterday, and in the book, it introduces a "rule" in American Phonetics, wherein D and T stops are elided from consonant clusters /LD/ and /LT/ in case they are surrounded by vowels.

For example :

"salty" becomes "sawli"
"building" becomes "billing"
"halted" becomes "hawlid" (Thanks Miss Julie for pointing out the typo!)

I personally think that this is sloppy to the point that it may hinder listener understanding, so here I am, asking your opinions. (if I hear anyone say "sawli food" I would take it as "solid food")

I think D and T may be elided if the LD and LT clusters are followed by a consonant, in the following example : cold drink said as "coal drink," but not if followed by a vowel.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance and have a great day!! :)
 
Last edited:
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    >I personally think that this is sloppy to the point that it may hinder listener understanding ..

    I wholeheartedly agree. Feel free to name the book, and tell us which variant of English it purports to be teaching you to emulate ( - it's not mine).
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This may be true in some regional speech patterns, since the U.S. is a large country and many of its regional speech patterns developed before modern transportation made travel easy and radio/television made listeners/viewers aware of how people speak in other areas. However, I have friends who grew up in many parts of the U.S., and this is not true in any speech patterns that I remember hearing.

    I don't think your proposed rule is restrictive enough. Perhaps they may be elided if they are followed by another D or T, as in "cold drink," but not if they are followed by a dissimilar consonant. I would not pronounce "cold room" as "coal room," or "cold fish" as "coal fish."
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I notice you have rule in quotation marks. What you describe may be an observation that somespeakers will do this. Are you sure you are interpreting the book (the one you are quoting and which Beryl asked you to name as the source) correctly? It is certainly not the case that most AmE speakers do this!
     

    zagzam

    New Member
    korean
    Thanks everyone for the feedback. You guys rock!!

    The title's "American Spoken English Pronunciations - Teacher's Guidebook." It was written by a Korean author. (Googling for the title is a waste of time -- since it'll just lead to some Korean website with Korean characters all over the place.)

    As the title suggests, the book's supposed to tackle different rules in American Pronunciation, but there were so many "rules" that I simply couldn't agree to.

    In a different chapter, he even mentioned the phenomenon of intrusive-R in American English, which I've never heard of!

    Classic examples on the internet being, "idea(r) of it" and "law(r) and order"

    I wanted to seek clarification from the professionals in this forum regarding the D and T dropping in LD and LT consonant cluster to give the author the benefit of the doubt.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Are you sure these are "rules" or just lists of ways that some people speak? The intiusive R is common in BrE but regional and less common in AmE, so that example from your book we can tell you is not a "rule"!
     

    zagzam

    New Member
    korean
    Are you sure these are "rules" or just lists of ways that some people speak? The intiusive R is common in BrE but regional and less common in AmE, so that example from your book we can tell you is not a "rule"!
    Well, I'm just using the exact term the author used. However, I think you're right. It's more proper to take it as a long list of ways that some people speak English in America than rules. :)

    Oh and.. thanks! So intrusive R is more of an accent in GA setting after all.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    [....]

    In a different chapter, he even mentioned the phenomenon of intrusive-R in American English, which I've never heard of!

    Classic examples on the internet being, "idea(r) of it" and "law(r) and order"
    [....]
    For further discussion of this topic, please see this long thread:Intrusive 'r'

    It discusses the intrusive-R in American English as well as British English.
     
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