among her friends (syntactic analysis)

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Intoarut

Senior Member
Latin American Spanish
Hello everyone,

In a sentence like this one:

She caused a sensation among her friends.

A SENSATION is direct object, and I feel that AMONG HER FRIENDS is some kind of adjunct, though I can't really identify (or find anywhere) what kind of adjunct.

So I'm starting to think that the direct object could be A SENSATION AMONG HER FRIENDS, and then AMONG HER FRIENDS is functioning as a post-modifier (which makes sense, as prepositional phrases can function as post-modifiers.)

Any help is welcome!
 
  • Cholo234

    Senior Member
    American English
    Any help is welcome!
    I think you understand the sentence well.

    A direct object refers to the noun phrase ("yes", the term "noun phrase" includes pronouns) that indicates the entity receiving the action. A noun phrase includes the noun (such as sensation, the head of the phrase) and its modifiers (like in the pub last night, below).
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    MonsieurGonzalito

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Argentina
    The way English syntactic analysis terms mix semantic and syntactic categories blows my mind, so I won't get into nomenclature.

    But, to the point of the OP, no, "among her friends" is a "complemento circunstancial de lugar" (whatever you choose to call it in English), and it is not part of the direct object. It is linked to the verb (where it "caused" it), not to the "sensation".
     

    Intoarut

    Senior Member
    Latin American Spanish
    The way English syntactic analysis terms mix semantic and syntactic categories blows my mind, so I won't get into nomenclature.

    But, to the point of the OP, no, "among her friends" is a "complemento circunstancial de lugar" (whatever you choose to call it in English), and it is not part of the direct object. It is linked to the verb (where it "caused" it), not to the "sensation".


    Thanks for your answers!
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I would call it an adjunct, not a complement, most likely belonging to "caused", but it might, though this is unlikely, be a a post modifier to "sensation".

    I am not sure about the scope of "lugar", but "among her friends" probably does not refer to literal location. It means her friends were stimulated by talking to each other about it.
     
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