among others

Palalana

Member
Polish
Hi,

I'm helping my friend to translate an abstract for his paper on the Polish Presidency in the UE. I'm wondering whether I put the expression "among others" in the correct place in the sentence. Could you advise?

The first chapter defines the term ‘presidency’ in general. It focuses, among others, on such matters as its origin, history and the role played by the state holding the Presidency.
 
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  • shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    The positioning is good, whether it is appropriate is another matter. I would use it in the sequence '.... deals with ...' but 'focuses' would require mentioning the salient issues without exception, I think.
     

    Momerath

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with shawnee and sdgraham:

    You could say

    "It deals with such matters as ..."


    and leave out "among other (things)", which is redundant.

    Or you could say

    "It focuses in particular on .... "
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    One cannot say 'it focuses on' = pay particular attention to, with the noun = the center of interest or activity, and follow it by "among others" and then - AGAIN - give a list of different topics: origin, history...

    One might say, "The report focuses on the 20 counties in the South-East of England" because it is seeing that area as a whole, separate from all the rest of the UK.

    "It (the first chapter) covers, among others, (onOMIT) such matters as its origin, history, (COMMA) and the role played by the state holding the Presidency."
     
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    Momerath

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think a paper can focus on/pay attention to more than one thing. If you add "in particular" or "notably", you imply that it singles out certain aspects of a wide-ranging subject for special consideration.
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you add "in particular" or "notably", you imply that it singles out certain aspects of a wide-ranging subject for special consideration.


    Leave out the 'notably' and that's good too! :):tick:
    'notably' adds a sense of 'in a way that is striking or remarkable' to the idea of 'in particular', which is not warranted with the given sentence.
     

    Momerath

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not suggesting you use both. According to Merriam-Websters "notably" and "particularly/in particular" are synonymous. (See Merriam-Websters online - Notably - No 2.)
     
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