an act of creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "an act of creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words" refer to "an act of creative bravery that is not always consistent to those simple but demanding words"?

Thanks in advance

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The task of initiating a 'new'or even 'unique' watch is an act of creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words.

-Patek Philippe (advertisement)
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The complete ad is found on page 5 of this PDF file. It begins with this line and quote:

    The head of the Patek Philippe company says: "In our family-owned company, a simple silk ribbon can be the inspiration for a watch adorned with 273 diamonds."

    The task of initiating a ‘new’ or even ‘unique’ watch is an act of creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words.


    "True" here means "faithful."

    To answer your question, I've read this passage several times, and the entire ad a couple of times, and the second sentence above, in referencing the president's quotation, is meaningless to me. I read them as just words chosen by some copywriter because it sounds good, but not having any real relationship to the quote. Perhaps someone else gets something out of it.

    Patek Philippe is known for its thoughtful, philosophical messages connected with their line "Begin your own tradition," and indeed, their slogan "You never actually own a Patek Philippe, you merely look after it for the next generation" is fairly touching and memorable (especially after you see it 50 times). And while I appreciate long-copy advertising, this ad fails me on the second sentence.

    The fourth paragraph of the ad is this: A reflection of the gymnast’s ribbon that floats and infinitely spirals in a display of balletic beauty and discipline, the Patek Philippe ‘Diamond Ribbon’ pays homage to all aspects of the watchmakers’ craft – particularly the gem setters’ art.

    This would seem to exactly match the president's quotation about "... a simple silk ribbon can be the inspiration for a watch adorned with 273 diamonds." So I'm missing the point about the brand's "creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words." Those words seem to contradict the president's message, rather than reinforce it.

    The creativity is true to those simple words, and the words themselves are not demanding at all – they're just a musing on how creativity happens at Patek Philippe.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think it's the head of the company's way of saying that not all companies have the freedom to go in for this kind of "creative bravery", because they are mainly concerned with making money. He seems to be saying that his company is above such mundane needs.

    In our family-owned watch company, we have the freedom to explore the imagination uninhibited by commercial restraints
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think it's the head of the company's way of saying that not all companies have the freedom to go in for this kind of "creative bravery", because they are mainly concerned with making money. He seems to be saying that his company is above such mundane needs.
    Then it's not bravery, is it?

    And I don't see how the fact that they have enough money to do anything they want relates to an explanation of "... an act of creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words," as the OP asks. Those "demanding words" would be the words of the president that precede this sentence.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'm sorry, Copyright. I didn't have the time this morning to go beyond my first impression, and I didn't make myself clear.

    The link to the complete text of the ad was very useful. I wonder whether it is a translation, and how the original sounded.


    In this ad there is an emphasis on Patek Philippe's being the only company that is more interested in quality than material gain:rolleyes:.

    ...the freedom to explore the imagination uninhibited by commercial restraints.
    ...watchmaking excellence that goes beyond any existing standards...
    ...‘how beautiful will it be?’ not ‘how many will we sell?

    The task of initiating a 'new' or even 'unique' watch is an act of creative bravery that is not always true to those simple but demanding words.

    The sentence doesn't make a lot of sense to me, but the general idea behind the ad is clear. I think that "act of creative bravery" must refer to "taking a simple silk ribbon as inspiration".

    So what are the "simple but demanding words"? I think they may be the words "new" and "unique". By calling them "simple but demanding" I think he may be saying that coming up with something new and unique is more difficult than it sounds, and he's implying that in trying to do just that, other companies (which are not free to concentrate on sheer quality but might have to cut a lot of corners to deliver a product that will sell well), fail miserably. Perhaps he means that they come up with something rather "tacky" (lacking in taste). It isn't enough to strive to make a big impression through the novelty value of the product.


     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I wonder whether it is a translation, and how the original sounded.
    No, they write in English. :)

    Thanks to your comments, I realize that the only way to read it is to fence off that first paragraph, i.e. treat it as separate from the rest of the copy (deletable, if you will). When you do that, it’s understandable.
    So what are the "simple but demanding words"? I think they may be the words "new" and "unique". By calling them "simple but demanding" I think he may be saying that coming up with something new and unique is more difficult than it sounds, and he's implying that in trying to do just that, other companies (which are not free to concentrate on sheer quality but might have to cut a lot of corners to deliver a product that will sell well), fail miserably.
    With the first paragraph ignored, I agree.

    Thanks again … I can sleep now. Although making your president a shill for a particular watch, rather than a visionary for the company, may keep me awake for an extra few minutes. :)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Yes, it's only the first paragraph that quotes the words of the head of the company. It tells us rather enigmatically what the "original inspiration" for the Diamond Ribbon watch was.

    The origins of the Patek Philippe ‘Diamond Ribbon’ may seem unlikely. Until you see the result.

    So, in answer to the OP's question about "true to", I would say that the ideal is to be bravely creative (daring to use an unlikely idea), while remaining true to (not diverging from the ideal of) what making a new and unique watch should really mean - one that will be new and unique (which is simple), but at the same time a product of excellence, craftsmanship, beauty, good taste, etc., (which is demanding).

    (I'm just happy to wear any old watch that tells me what time it is :D)

     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, it's only the first paragraph that quotes the words of the head of the company. It tells us rather enigmatically what the "original inspiration" for the Diamond Ribbon watch was.
    Which is giving away the punchline before you tell the joke. :rolleyes:
    The origins of the Patek Philippe ‘Diamond Ribbon’ may seem unlikely. Until you see the result.
    Another meaningless statement.
    So, in answer to the OP's question about "true to", I would say that the ideal is to be bravely creative (daring to use an unlikely idea), while remaining true to (not diverging from the ideal of) what making a new and unique watch should really mean - one that will be new and unique (which is simple), but at the same time a product of excellence, craftsmanship, beauty, good taste, etc., (which is demanding).
    As close as we'll get, I think.
     
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