(an) action and (the) result

VicNicSor

Senior Member
Russian
over
used to express action and result
oxforddictionaries

If the definition had been written according to all the grammar rules, it'd look like "used to express an action and the result", am I right?
Thank you.
 
  • sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    Titles, headings, short definitions, notices and slogans = usually consist of short phrases and articles are usually left out.
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I can't believe the dicionary did not give an example to show what it meant.
    Without an example, you are just speculating.
    For example, if we say "On March 31 winter is over", where is the action? And what is the result?
     

    VicNicSor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I thought the examples were irrelevant to the grammar of the definition.
    Here they are:
    Used to express action and result:
    the car flipped over
    hand the money over

    • You have to hand it over to a director and allow them to do what they want to it.
    • It will be preserved and covered over by the floor slab of the new building.
    • The real eyesore was the derelict building we took over, which was covered in vandalism.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I can't believe the dicionary did not give an example to show what it meant....
    It did, e2: see adverb 3 here, where the examples are the car flipped over and hand the money over.

    That said, I think Vik was asking about the formulation of the [abbreviated] definition. I agree with you, Vik: I, too, would expand it as "used to express an action and the result" or possibly "used to express an action and its result".

    I find it quite hard to see how that definition relates to the examples - but that's another issue;).

    -------

    (Cross-posted with Vik. I'm definitely in slow-typist mode today:eek:)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The examples are essential for what (without them) I find an obscure definition.
    In the case of prepositional verbs the definition does not always work, e.g. Think it over!
     
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