an adjective to give weight to a journal

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eli7

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
Greetings,

I want to write to the managing editor of an international journal to ask for submitting my paper.
How am I supposed to give weight to the journal? I mean to be respectful enough.
can I use "weighty journal" or "respectful" or what?
I want to submit my paper in your ..... journal?

Thank you
 
  • gramman

    Senior Member
    There are a few words you could use. Miss Julie's suggestion of esteemed is one of them. You would want "respected," not "respectful." "Distinguished" and "prestigious" also come to mind. My choice would be "respected" because it's laudatory but not fawning.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    There are a few words you could use. Miss Julie's suggestion of esteemed is one of them. You would want "respected," not "respectful." "Distinguished" and "prestigious" also come to mind. My choice would be "respected" because it's laudatory but not fawning.
    These are good as well. Since we're really not supposed to provide lists of words in this forum, we should end our suggestions here. :eek:
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It is not necessary to say anything to a journal editor when you submit a paper. Words such as "your esteemed journal," "your respected journal" and so on will not affect what happens to your paper in any way, especially if the editor is a native speaker of English. English professional writing style does not use adjectives like those, even though many educated people know that the usual style in some other languages is to use them. The only effect of these words is to identify the writer as a native speaker of one of those languages. English professional style is short and to the point, with no unnecessary words.

    Simply say that you are submitting the attached paper for publication in the Journal of Fish and Flowers (or whatever it is). Remember: the editor wants your paper! His or her job is to publish papers (after the journal's review process). Then make the paper as good as it can be. Acceptance depends on the quality of your paper, not (within broad limits) on the quality of your cover letter.
     

    eli7

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    There are a few words you could use. Miss Julie's suggestion of esteemed is one of them. You would want "respected," not "respectful." "Distinguished" and "prestigious" also come to mind. My choice would be "respected" because it's laudatory but not fawning.
    Thanks a tone :)

    It is not necessary to say anything to a journal editor when you submit a paper. Words such as "your esteemed journal," "your respected journal" and so on will not affect what happens to your paper in any way, especially if the editor is a native speaker of English. English professional writing style does not use adjectives like those, even though many educated people know that the usual style in some other languages is to use them. The only effect of these words is to identify the writer as a native speaker of one of those languages. English professional style is short and to the point, with no unnecessary words.

    Simply say that you are submitting the attached paper for publication in the Journal of Fish and Flowers (or whatever it is). Remember: the editor wants your paper! His or her job is to publish papers (after the journal's review process). Then make the paper as good as it can be. Acceptance depends on the quality of your paper, not (within broad limits) on the quality of your cover letter.
    Thanks a million for the guidance :)
     
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