an afterthought placed well behind

hadijoon

Member
Persian
Hello;

The meaning of the underlined phrase is ambiguous to me. Any help would be highly appreciated:

Defeating IR missiles used to be an afterthought placed well behind surviving the radar missile threat.

Thanks.
 
  • 0hisa2me

    Senior Member
    British English
    An afterthought means that it was not the main preoccupation, but came at some way down the list of priorities. In this case, it comes a long way down the list of priorities ("placed well behind"). So the idea is that defeating IR missiles was considered, in the past, as relatively unimportant, and much less important than surviving the radar missile threat.

    Hope this makes sense.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    The relative pronoun that and the verb to be are often omitted in English.

    Defeating IR missiles used to be an afterthought that was placed well behind surviving the radar missile threat.

    Does that help?
     
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