an approach run by an athlete

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
run-up
an approach run by an athlete for a long jump, pole vault, etc
Collins

Is the "run" a participle or a noun?
Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It could be either, but I think I'd pronounce it as a noun. That is, 'approach run' is a noun + noun sequence, which therefore has main stress on the first noun:

    an approach run by an athlete

    If 'approach' was the only noun, the verb 'run' would have equal or greater stress:

    an approach run by an athlete

    And somehow 'approach run' with verb 'run' doesn't seem very natural to me, though it's hard to say why: 'an approach made to a potential customer' is quite normal. I suppose we wouldn't say the athlete runs the approach; rather, they make the approach as part of their run.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I disagree. "Approach" is a noun; "run" here is a participle.

    This was an opinion written by me. Same structure as that used in the definition you quote.
     
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