An article with a set of proper nouns connected by a slash

aush

Member
Russian
I was reading the Slash (punctuation) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and it says:

Connecting non-contrasting items

The slash is also used as a shorter substitute for the conjunction "and" or inclusive or (i.e., A or B or both),[11] typically in situations where it fills the role of a hyphen or en dash. For example, the "Hemingway/Faulkner generation" might be used to discuss the era of the Lost Generation inclusive of the people around and affected by both Hemingway and Faulkner.
Which one is correct?

1) I prefer to live in Laos/Myanmar kind of countries.
2) I prefer to live in a Laos/Myanmar kind of countries.
3) I prefer to live in the Laos/Myanmar kind of countries.

When proper nouns are combined by the slash mark, do they become a compound noun, is it now a proper or a common noun?
 
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  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    You do not need a question mark after any of the examples - they are not questions.

    1) I prefer to live in Laos/Myanmar kind of countries. :confused:
    2) I prefer to live in a Laos/Myanmar kind of countries :cross: A/an cannot qualify a plural noun.
    3) I prefer to live in the Laos/Myanmar kind of countries. :confused:

    "Laos/Myanmar kind of" is a descriptor -> it acts adjectivally. As far as definite and indefinite articles are concerned, it has no influence on the main noun "countries."

    "Type" would be better throughout in place of "kind".

    Pace the inhabitants of Laos and Myanmar, but they are much the same type of place/country.

    Countries seems wrong1 - it should be "country": the slash offers alternative readings.
    3a) I prefer to live in the Laos/Myanmar type of country.
    3b) I prefer to live in a Laos/Myanmar type of country.

    The choice of a or the will be decided by context or, in this case, personal choice.

    1 unless you intend to live in several countries.
     

    aush

    Member
    Russian
    You do not need a question mark after any of the examples - they are not questions.
    Oops, sure, made a typo and copypasted it.

    "Laos/Myanmar kind of" is a descriptor -> it acts adjectivally.
    Thanks, it makes sense for me now! I'd like to know about a situation when a set of words combined with the slash mark acts as a noun, but in any example I'm coming up with it acts adjectivally...
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It is used in your linked Wiki article with common nouns:
    The slash is commonly used in many languages as a shorter substitute for the conjunction "or", typically with the sense of exclusive or (e.g., Y/N permits yes or no but not both). Its use in this sense is somewhat informal, although it is used in philology to note variants (e.g., virgula/uirgula) ...
    It is commonly used on the WRF site to indicate alternatives: "To go is a general verb of motion - you can go to town by bus/car/bike, etc."

    Using proper nouns as nouns, it was common at one time to see headlines like "The Troubles in Burma/Myanmar continue." This was at a time when no common recognition of the new name existed.

    Properer nouns that are names (geo-political and personal names, i.e. rather than descriptions) are usually considered to be uncountable, and (i) are not qualified by "a/an" and (ii) are only rarely used with the definite article.
     
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