an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance

lenguyen190298

Member
Vietnamese
I am having trouble with the syntax in the bold line:
"Three girls, the two eldest sixteen and fourteen, was an awful legacy for a mother to bequeath, an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance of a conceited, silly father."

What do "charge", "authority" and "guidance" mean here? Please help!

Source: Persuasion, by Jane Austen <Source from original thread title added to post by moderator (Florentia52)>
 
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  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Responsibility for three daughters was:

    an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance of a conceited, silly father

    =
    an awful load/burden … to entrust to a conceited, silly father for [their] upbringing
     

    lenguyen190298

    Member
    Vietnamese
    I would have said "charge" was more a responsibility here, rather than a burden ,but "charge" can mean either.
    Yes that seems to have the meaning a little more unexaggerated but in this case I guess it's true that either works. Thank you for all the help 😊😊
     
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