An elegant term for pine field

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
Watching Magpies in Pine Field
Viewing Magpies in Pine Trees


Three a small land/field of about twenty pine trees on our campus. Which of the above would sounds better for it? Any comment will be much appreciated.
 
  • Prairiefire

    Senior Member
    US (Midwest) - English
    What are you writing? A letter? Poems? A brochure advertising the college?

    I'm very curious.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Watching Magpies in Pine Field
    Viewing Magpies in Pine Trees


    Three a small land/field of about twenty pine trees on our campus. Which of the above would sounds better for it? Any comment will be much appreciated.
    Those are very short, terse sentences, QD. Are these intended to be part of a sentence or some kind of title for something? When you say "Which of the above would sound better for it?", I wonder if these are names... I'll confess to being confused at what you're asking.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks, my friends, for your consideration.
    I mean I want to find an elegant term for the small pine field. Which of my two versions sounds better.
    Well, it must be a cultural thing, QD, because I'm not really sure what magpies have to do with it... having said that, though, if I had to choose, I'd go for "Viewing Magpies in Pine Trees"
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, Dimcl.
    I was in a hurry in the morning when I posted this thread.
    Well, we often give a place an elegant and poetic term.So, in fact, there are no magpies in the pine field, but the Chinese version is a very beautiful phrase. So, I wondered if I translated it litterally, would you be able to understand it?
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks, Dimcl.
    I was in a hurry in the morning when I posted this thread.
    Well, we often give a place an elegant and poetic term.So, in fact, there are no magpies in the pine field, but the Chinese version is a very beautiful phrase. So, I wondered if I translated it litterally, would you be able to understand it?
    Yes, it's perfectly understandable, QD, but the translation has me expecting the subject of the phrase to be magpies, not pine trees.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thanks, Dimcl.
    I agree with you. So, I'm racking my brain to find the right term focusing on the pine field.
    How about something that plays on the fact that the pines stand together ie: "fellowship", "brotherhood"? I'm thinking along the lines of being together ie: "Viewing Fellowship of Pines". I know that the names you are talking about are usually more visual than this, though... :eek:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    There is still no sign of context.
    Any of the above suggestions, from the prosaic to the prolix, could be either exactly right or totally inappropriate.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    And just to ask again for context: are you looking for a new name, QD? a translation of a Chinese name? a caption for a picture? or something else entirely?

    Loob
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
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