An email for/to our customers

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atakeris

Senior Member
Latvian
Hello,

I hear different opinions on this.

Let's say I have sentences:
- It's an email to/for our customers (to be sent to our customers)
- Here are points of considedartion to/for the agenda (to be added to the agenda)

Is it grammatically correct to leave "to" or should I always go with "for"?
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    You may be hearing "different opinions" because your two sentences have nothing in common. What do you mean by "always go with 'for?'"

    You send an e-mail to someone. It might be possible to construct a sentence and context where an e-mail was "for" someone, but in your sentence, and without the required context, I would expect to see "to."

    Here are points of consideration for the agenda. :tick:
    I want to add some new items to the agenda. :tick:
     

    atakeris

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    You may be hearing "different opinions" because your two sentences have nothing in common. What do you mean by "always go with 'for?'"

    You send an e-mail to someone. It might be possible to construct a sentence and context where an e-mail was "for" someone, but in your sentence, and without the required context, I would expect to see "to."

    Here are points of consideration for the agenda. :tick:
    I want to add some new items to the agenda. :tick:
    I know that if you say "to add... to..." it's a no-brainer that you should use "to".

    But if you take my original sentences:

    It's an email to/for our customers
    Here are points of consideration to/for the agenda

    Which preposition is correct if I want to imply the direction where the objects (email and points of consideration) should go?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    As I said in #2, "It's an e-mail to our customers" and "Here are points of consideration for the agenda" are correct.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    If I went up to a workmate's desk and asked "What's that you're writing?" and he replied "It's an email for our customers", I would take it as meaning intended for.

    If he replied "It's an email to our customers, that would suggest to me that he was going to send it off straightaway as soon as he'd finished writing it. :)
     

    atakeris

    Senior Member
    Latvian
    If I went up to a workmate's desk and asked "What's that you're writing?" and he replied "It's an email for our customers", I would take it as meaning intended for.

    If he replied "It's an email to our customers, that would suggest to me that he was going to send it off straightaway as soon as he'd finished writing it. :)
    In other words, both are almost always interchangeable without verbs, hm?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In other words, both are almost always interchangeable without verbs, hm?
    Not altogether, because the OP's question in post #3 was:
    "Which preposition is correct if I want to imply the direction where the objects (email and points of consideration) should go?"

    If that's the inference you want to convey then you need "to", because "for" denotes, as I said, intended for.
     
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