an enormous crowd gathers on the central square

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Shandol

Senior Member
Hello everybody. Hope you are doing well.
Today I came across a sentence taken form "Can You Believe It Book 2". The sentence is "By noon on the day of the festival, an enormous crowd gathers on the central square". My question is that why on? I think it should have said "an enormous crowd gathers around/at the central square", or even the writer could have used in the central square.
What do you think about it? Does it sound correct to you?
Thanks.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    What is the central square? If it is a town or city square, then "in" is the usual word, because it is enclosed by buildings. By contrast, a village green, which usually is not enclosed in by buildings, takes the preposition "on". If the square is something laid out in a field, then "on" seems natural to me; the people are standing on it.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's not that specific. Neither is right or wrong. Some people say each. In certain circumstances, one might be more common.

    "In" emphasizes it's an enclosed space surrounded by buildings.
    "On" emphasizes it's an enormous, open, paved space.

    THE RESTAURANTS OF THE HISTORIC MARIETTA SQUARE
    At Eat on the Square we’ve brought together all of the great cuisines of the Historic Marietta Square.
    Restaurants
     
    Last edited:

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    It's not that specific. Neither is right or wrong. Some people say each. In certain circumstances, one might be more common.

    "In" emphasizes it's an enclosed space surrounded by buildings.
    "On" emphasizes it's an enormous, open, paved space.

    THE RESTAURANTS OF THE HISTORIC MARIETTA SQUARE
    At Eat on the Square we’ve brought together all of the great cuisines of the Historic Marietta Square.
    Restaurants
    Thank you my friend. You've elucidated it very well.
     
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