an even more powerful subatomic analog

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "an even more powerful subatomic analog" mean "(this "quarksplostion" has) a subatomic analog of x (here x refers to "the individual nuclear fusion reactions that take place in the cores of hydrogen bombs"), but this analog is more powerful"?

Thanks in advance

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The duo showed that two tiny particles known as bottom quarks could theoretically fuse together in a powerful flash. The result: a larger subatomic particle, a second, spare particle known as a nucleon, and a whole mess of energy spilling out into the universe. This "quarksplosion" would be an even more powerful subatomic analog of the individual nuclear fusion reactions that take place in the cores of hydrogen bombs.

-Scientific American

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  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think "analog" here is just a fancy way of saying there are similarities between the quarksplosion and nuclear fusion (both unite two particles and both produce energy).

    I guess that "powerful" means that it produces more energy (than fusion???), rather than that it is more powerful (persuasive) evidence of something.
     
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