an extremely busy lifestyle with school,

Discussion in 'English Only' started by quietdandelion, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Pat has an extremely busy lifestye with school, work, and her family.



    What does with mean in the above context? For me, in instead of with makes more sense there? Thanks.
     
  2. nzseries1

    nzseries1 Senior Member

    London
    New Zealand - English
    I think with is more natural. Perhaps you could replace with with which revolves around. Pat has an extremely busy lifestyle which revolves around school, work, and her family.

    Perhaps using with, it would be better to explain if we wrote the following:
    Pat has an extremely busy lifestyle, with school, work, and her family taking up much of her time.
     
  3. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, nz, for your explanation.
    Your reply reminds me of the following interpretation:

    Pat has an extremely busy lifestye which is involved/concerned with school, work, and her family.

    I doubt if my interpretation makes sense to you.
     
  4. nzseries1

    nzseries1 Senior Member

    London
    New Zealand - English
    I would say that technically, it is Pat herself, not Pat's lifestyle, who is involved with or concerned with school, work, and her family.

    Pat is involved/concerned with school, work, and her family, which means she has an extremely busy lifestyle.

    However, I think you would probably get away with your sentence also.
     
  5. quietdandelion

    quietdandelion Banned

    Homesweethome
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, nz, for the explanation.
    I get it now.
     

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