[an] immediate action

Hi helpers,


I can use both of the expressions?


We are waiting for immedate action.

We are waiting for an immediate action.


We want an immediate action.

We want immediate action.


If both are possible, what is the difference?


I think when I use 'an action' it means the action is completed.

Am I correct?
 
  • reganse

    Senior Member
    English – U.S.
    Yes, both are correct. When you say: we are waiting for an immediate action, it means that you are waiting for a particular action in regard to a particular problem or situation.
    When you say: we are waiting for immediate action (without the article "an), it means that you are waiting for someone to do "something" – any kind of action to solve the problem.
    We are waiting for action – we want someone to solve this problem in any possible way.
    We are waiting for an action - we want someone to solve this problem in the way that we are expecting, in the way that we discussed.
    It's a very subtle difference, I guess.
     

    reganse

    Senior Member
    English – U.S.
    You're welcome. :)
    The most common way to say this would be:
    We are waiting for immediate action … on the matter …

    (without the article "an)
     
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