An issue over or with the reciprocal complement

hyeonjeongjeong

New Member
Korean
I am very confused.
1) They raised an issue with the reciprocal complement principle
2) They raised an issue over the reciprocal complement principle
3) They raised an issue as applying the reciprocal complement principle
Should I use with, over, or as applying? Or is the sentence wrong as a whole?
Thanks
 
Last edited:
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    You probably need to give more information. Was the issue about the rule in general, how to apply it in a particular situation, whether it applies at all in a particular situation, or something else?
     

    hyeonjeongjeong

    New Member
    Korean
    You probably need to give more information. Was the issue about the rule in general, how to apply it in a particular situation, whether it applies at all in a particular situation, or something else?
    The following is the full paragraph.
    The kingdom of Israel had a reason to care for widows at the national levels, which, nonetheless, did not deny the role of home and family, or impose full responsibility on the government to care for all widows, which, thus, didn't raise an issue as applying the reciprocal complement principle.
     

    hyeonjeongjeong

    New Member
    Korean
    The following is the full paragraph.
    The kingdom of Israel had a reason to care for widows at the national levels, which, nonetheless, did not deny the role of home and family, or impose full responsibility on the government to care for all widows, which, thus, didn't raise an issue as applying the reciprocal complement principle.

    Using regarding, can I change the sentence as follows?
    The kingdom of Israel had a reason to care for widows at the national levels, which, nonetheless, did not deny the role of home and family, or impose full responsibility on the government to care for all widows, which, thus, didn't raise an issue as (or when) regarding the reciprocal complement principle.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Where did you see this paragraph? We always ask the source. Was it in a book? If so, what is the book's name?

    I have never heard of "the reciprocal complement principle". I have no idea what it is. I don't know what words to use, to connect "raising an issue" with it. Maybe it is an idea this writer invented, and is using ancient Israel as an example. Or maybe it was an idea used in the government of ancient Israel. Or maybe it is something else.

    Is "the reciprocal complement principle" defined or explained, earlier in this book?
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Gosh! I had been expecting something connected with probability, although the terminology isn't quite what I am used to. I have no idea what this passage refers to. I wasn't aware of Israel's being a kingdom for well over 2000 years, and this, together with the unexpected "at the national levels", makes me wonder whether this is a poor translation from another language.
     

    hyeonjeongjeong

    New Member
    Korean
    Gosh! I had been expecting something connected with probability, although the terminology isn't quite what I am used to. I have no idea what this passage refers to. I wasn't aware of Israel's being a kingdom for well over 2000 years, and this, together with the unexpected "at the national levels", makes me wonder whether this is a poor translation from another language.
    Thank you so much for your reply. So, what should I change the phrase "at the national levels" to? (1) Can I say "Ancient Israel had a national factor in caring for widows?" (2) What does "the reciprocal complement" mean? Is that a correct expression?
     

    hyeonjeongjeong

    New Member
    Korean
    In this context, I have no idea.

    Since I cannot understand what the sentence means, I have no idea how it should be expressed.
    Thank you for your reply. It is a korean expression "Saangho Boh-aahn" that I have been trying to interpret. The expression literally means "helping each other, covering the other's weak points and instead completing the weak points for the other etc" Do you an English idiom or expression other than being complementary? Actually can I say they are complementary??
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I don't think you can say "they are complementary" -- it is too vague. They complement each other in what way? Fashion? Style? Physical appearance? Eating habits? Sleep hours? You might use "complementary" with a very specific meaning, made clear by the context.

    But this idea is familiar. Here are a couple common phrases:

    If a couple is married (or in a similar relationship), one of them often says about the other one "he/she completes me."

    In a fighting situation, an attack from behind is dangerous. So people say (literally or metaphorically) "Joe covers my back". If two people "cover each other's back" they protect each other's weak points.

    But you need a less aggressive phrase: two people that accomplish a lot together, because each one has skills that the other lacks. If I remember a phrase for that, I'll post again.
     

    hyeonjeongjeong

    New Member
    Korean
    I don't think you can say "they are complementary" -- it is too vague. They complement each other in what way? Fashion? Style? Physical appearance? Eating habits? Sleep hours? You might use "complementary" with a very specific meaning, made clear by the context.

    But this idea is familiar. Here are a couple common phrases:

    If a couple is married (or in a similar relationship), one of them often says about the other one "he/she completes me."

    In a fighting situation, an attack from behind is dangerous. So people say (literally or metaphorically) "Joe covers my back". If two people "cover each other's back" they protect each other's weak points.

    But you need a less aggressive phrase: two people that accomplish a lot together, because each one has skills that the other lacks. If I remember a phrase for that, I'll post again.
    Thank you so much for the explanation.
     
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