(an) open-mouthed incredulity

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
The Vicar looked at him with open-mouthed incredulity.
Collins Cobuild

"... with an open-mouthed incredulity" would work here as well, am I right?
Thank you.
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I didn't say the original is incorrect.:) I meant that if an uncountable abstract noun is modified by an adjective (not necessarily by the way), it could turn into a countable noun. Don't you agree with that?
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I also think the version with "an" is OK.

    Language allows flexibility in certain contexts.

    If I would read it, I wouldn't think twice about its correctness. It sounds fine.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    This version with "an" would be very appropriate if the writer then went on to describe what distinguishes this particular form of open-mouthed incredulity from any other kind of open-mouthed incredulity:

    The vicar stared at him with an open-mouthed incredulity that amused the congregation no end.
     
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