ancient old-growth forest

_LC_

Senior Member
French
What does the phrase ancient old-growth forest refer to?

I found this in an article about Muir Woods. I do not know why it has two similar ideas (ancient and old growth).

Thanks for your help!
 
  • lullaby_80)

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    No sé de biología :) Pero parece ser que también hay árboles milenarios...

    Es todo lo que te puedo decir.
     

    Anndreih

    Member
    España, español
    Hi! I know it is a bit late but I had the same question and after browsing the net I ended up in this thread.

    It seems this topic about ancient old-growth forest is a bit vague.

    To start with ancient is the extreme adjective of old, that is "very old".

    And an old-growth forest is a forest or woodland having a mature ecosystem characterized by the presence of old woody plants and the wildlife and smaller plants associated with them. (definition from the net).

    So an attempt to translate the sentence could be,

    Un bosque milenario - un bosque centenario (both are posible)
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    How about selva virgen? The point is that it hasn't been cleared, woodcutters haven't got in. This means that not just the trees are old but that other flora and fauna are more likely to be intact.
     

    Anndreih

    Member
    España, español
    Hello again!

    I think the translation of "Selva virgen" could be "Virgin forest".

    Then, the old growth forests that haven't been spoilt are virgin forests.

    Byee.
     

    Anndreih

    Member
    España, español
    OK Cirrus, I see. It seems that wikipedia considers Old growth forests as Virgin forests, too. In that case, how do you say in English when a forest is ancient and unspoilt as well? We say 'selva virgen' in Spanish.

    In fact, I don't know why that wikipedia article uses virgin forest. For me the adjective virgin is quite clear. Maybe we have to wait for some environmentalist or forest engineer to clear up this subject, or maybe a keen documentaries watcher, who knows!
     

    JUNIO

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    Me ha surgido el tema "old growth" y lo de selva virgen para un bosque me suena extrañísimo. ¿Qué tal "vegetación antigua" o centenaria?

    The forest here was full of old growth, the trees tall, many of their lower branches cracked and hanging

    El bosque en ese punto estaba lleno de vegetación antigua/centenaria, los árboles eran altos y muchas de sus ramas estaban quebradas y colgaban de ellos.
     

    melibea

    Member
    Spain - Spanish/Catalan
    Sé que es un tema antiguo pero tal vez pueda ayudar a alguien. Se trataría de un bosque "maduro", es decir, en el que la vegetación ya tiene muchos años. Decir "centenario" o "milenario" sin estar seguros de cuántos años tienen los árboles de ese bosque, podría ser una incorrección.
     

    Anndreih

    Member
    España, español
    Sé que es un tema antiguo pero tal vez pueda ayudar a alguien. Se trataría de un bosque "maduro", es decir, en el que la vegetación ya tiene muchos años. Decir "centenario" o "milenario" sin estar seguros de cuántos años tienen los árboles de ese bosque, podría ser una incorrección.
    Thank you, Melibea. I also think that expression could be the most accurate to translate the "old-growth" part into Spanish. But the complete expression of the post was: "ancient old-growth forest". I have found an article in wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_woodland) that may be of help. It seems that "ancient woodland" is a UK expression, and "old-growth forest" is from the US. So, the original post could be a mix of both.
     
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