ANCILLARY RELIEF/CRIMINAL LAW: R v K [2009] EWCA Crim 1640

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  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The little v often means "versus" and in this case it would be one party, referred to as R and another party known as K in a case - the link takes us to a description of some issues in a divorce proceeding, so a reasonable guess is that Rv K means a legal case of R versus K (perhaps Richard versus Katherine :)). However, this is a technical legal context, so a legal forum may be more likely to have members who know this area.
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is a British criminal case (EWCA is the England and Wales Court of Appeal), so the prosecutor is usually the Queen (or the King), usually written as "R" (Rex or Regina, in Latin).

    I have checked this particular case and "R" is indeed the Queen.

    My guess is that "R" is never used for anonymity, because of this possible confusion. "K" is not necessarily related to the person's name. I have no idea how letters are assigned to anonymous defendants and witnesses in British trials, but my guess is that letters are either chosen at random or the next letter is taken from a list. When anonymous defendants and witnesses have later been named, there appears to be no connection between the letter used and the person's name.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    This is a British criminal case (EWCA is the England and Wales Court of Appeal), so the prosecutor is usually the Queen (or the King), usually written as "R" (Rex or Regina, in Latin).

    I have checked this particular case and "R" is indeed the Queen.

    My guess is that "R" is never used for anonymity, because of this possible confusion. "K" is not necessarily related to the person's name. I have no idea how letters are assigned to anonymous defendants and witnesses in British trials, but my guess is that letters are either chosen at random or the next letter is taken from a list. When anonymous defendants and witnesses have later been named, there appears to be no connection between the letter used and the person's name.
    The R as Rex or Regina was my next guess :D Thanks for digging it up. I suspect we will never know who K is
     
    This is a British criminal case (EWCA is the England and Wales Court of Appeal), so the prosecutor is usually the Queen (or the King), usually written as "R" (Rex or Regina, in Latin).

    I have checked this particular case and "R" is indeed the Queen.

    My guess is that "R" is never used for anonymity, because of this possible confusion. "K" is not necessarily related to the person's name. I have no idea how letters are assigned to anonymous defendants and witnesses in British trials, but my guess is that letters are either chosen at random or the next letter is taken from a list. When anonymous defendants and witnesses have later been named, there appears to be no connection between the letter used and the person's name.

    Nicely put, and correct, I think.
     
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