and am in no passion any more than he is."

enkidu68

Senior Member
turkish
Hi folks, this is coming from Colonel Jack by Defoe.
What does this bold one mean? Captain Jack is talking about taking revenge of real captain who cheated and kidnapped them.

Why does he not complete his villainy and murder us, and then he will be free from our revenge? But nothing else shall ever deliver him from my hands but sending us to the d--l, (devil?) or going thither himself; and I am honester in telling him so fairly than he has been to me, and am in no passion any more than he is."
 
  • enkidu68

    Senior Member
    turkish
    And I am adding a few next lines to give you more idea:

    The captain was, I say, a little shocked at his boldness, for he talked a great deal more of the same kind, with a great deal of spirit
    and fire, and yet without any disorder in his temper.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    People will often say harsh, or rash, or ill-considered things when they are in an unreasoning state of excitement or anger -- that is, in a passion. The speaker is saying that he is making this shocking statement not because the speaker is in a passion/furious/overwhelmed with anger, but because the statement is a description of the facts.

    You might want to compare the term "a crime of passion", which is a crime committed out of strong emotion and with no premeditation.
     
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