And besides, when I agree to do something, I do it.

stenka25

Senior Member
South Korea, Han-gul
The below is the example sentence of the word "besides."

I cannot figure out the meaning of it.

Can you explain the meaning to me?

I need the money. And besides, when I agree to do something, I do it.
 
  • manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    The below is the example sentence of the word "besides."

    I cannot figure out the meaning of it.

    Can you explain the meaning to me?

    I need the money. And besides, when I agree to do something, I do it.
    It is a reference to something which has previously/already been mentioned, which strengthens the speaker's case or makes it clear that the two (apparently unconnected ideas) are in fact linked.

    Out of its full context, it makes limited sense, but I guess that's what's happening. You could almost substitute 'anyway' or 'in any case' and the meaning would not alter. I think!
     

    jonjonsin

    Member
    English - American
    I'm shooting from the hip here, so be forewarned. I think "besides" made be shortened from something. Maybe "besides the point." Anyway, here the first reason for whatever the speaker is about to do is because she needs the money. "Besides" kind of pushes off the table so to speak. She agreed to do it, so she would have done it regardless. So, besides it kind of like regardless, but here I believe the context is more of a rationalization. That's to say, she doesn't really want to do 'it', but she needs the money and she agreed to do it.
     
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