And [dialectical meanings? "breath" or "to breath, whisper, scheme, imagine."]

Mbr84

New Member
English - United States
Hi all. First post. I was looking up the etymology of "and" and was surprised to find that in the UK it has a dialectal sense "1)breath & to breath. to whisper, scheme, devise, imagine. 2) Sea mist," complete with a really charming etymology, with synonymous roots, and cognates meaning "envy" and "avenge, punish"
i am desperately seeking authentic example sentences. But, because regular "and" is everywhere, and worse, is a Boolean operator, googling for it is a joke.

Anyone have one?
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello Mbr84 - welcome to the forums!

    I'm sorry, I don't really understand what it is you're looking for:(. Can you explain in different words?
     

    Mbr84

    New Member
    English - United States
    Oh, my mistake I meant to include the link. Wiktionary.
    en. m.wiktionary dot org/wiki/and
    (New members aren't allowed to post links, apparently. Sorry)
     

    Mbr84

    New Member
    English - United States
    Example sentence using "and" in its dialectal sense of "breath" or "to breath, whisper, scheme, imagine." Preferably, they won't be improvise, but will be examples of it being used by the people who use it.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Here is the relevant definition from Wiktionary's definition of 'and', Etymology 2
    .
    [noun] and (plural ands)
    1. (UK dialectal) Breath.
    2. (UK dialectal) Sea-mist; water-smoke.
    .
    [verb] and (third-person singular simple present ands, present participle anding, simple past and past participle anded)

    1. (UK dialectal, intransitive) To breathe; whisper; devise; imagine.
    .

    We don't provide examples of use, but we could ask whether any BE speakers have ever heard 'and' used with this meaning.
     
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    Mbr84

    New Member
    English - United States
    Ah, yes I guess I ought to have read the forum's guidelines. In any case, I'd be quite pleased if that were the thread's resolution.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello again, Mbr84.

    I've never come across any of those meanings myself. But I have found reference to them in Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, published in 1905.

    The noun meanings breath and sea-mist, labelled Scots/Yorkshire/Norfolk were categorised by Wright as ?Obs[olete]; the verb meaning breathe, whisper etc, labelled Scots, was categorised as Obs[olete], with no question mark.

    Perhaps that will help (I'm intrigued about why you're "desperate";):)).
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I have come across and as a noun and as a verb, but not in any of the above-mentioned senses, only in the context of mathematical or electronic logic.

    When you combine two or more logic values using an and-function (the result of which is true if and only if all the input values are true), you can refer to the result as "the and of the input values", and the action of applying such a function is called "anding". You can "and" one value with another.

    You can also or values or take the or of them, and there are two different kinds of or.
     

    Mbr84

    New Member
    English - United States
    Desperate may have been an overstatement.

    << Drifting from focus on language. >>

    This "and" with its black mark (to envy, and in old german, "to punish, avenge") on life (to breath), intrigues me. To find these warring principles here, on AND, the most basic operation of logic, was fun.
     
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