And hold onto your car [card] catalog Dewey decimals.

Spanish
#1
Hola a todo/as, me gustaría que alguien me ayudara con esta frase. El contexto no es muy claro, se trata de dos hombres que hablan sobre una biblioteca. El primero comenta que en esta biblioteca hay muchos libros y el segundo le contesta lo siguiente:

Survey says, time for a recount, bud. And hold onto your car catalog dewey decimals...

Entiendo el verbo hold onto como aferrarse a algo, pero en esta frase no sé muy bien qué quiere decir, y menos lo de car catalog (revista de coches?) y dewey decimals (decimales Dewey?). Veamos si alguien le encuentra sentido.

Saludos y gracias.
 
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  • Txiri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    #2
    Card catalogue: before the holdings of libraries were made available in electronic format, the books used to be catalogued by cards, and according to two numerical systems, one of which was the Dewey decimal system. These are standardized numbers used nationally in the USA, and so, if you are looking for a political science text, and go to the 450s, you'll find things of interest. The same with French literature (whatever the numbers are).

    Hold on to = hang on to =
    1) keep them,
    2) wait, something's about to happen with them

    your card catalogue Dewey decimals: (possibly) your old way of cataloguing the many many many books in the library
     

    St. Nick

    Senior Member
    English
    #3
    Hola. ¿No seria "card catalog ...," 'fichero de biblioteca' :confused: ? "... Señor Melvil Dewey," alusión en broma al creador del sistema.
     

    silvicrima

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Spain
    #5
    Hello,

    It's been a while since the last post, but I find this thread interesting.
    When you hear the sentence 'Hold onto your card/anything else', the first verb you think of is 'conservar'. However, I wonder if it's in the sense of 'guardar', as in 'no perder', or in the sense of 'take good care of it' or 'don't bend it or mess it up because it won't be good anymore', or possibly both.
    Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you,

    Silvia
     
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