and I <am saying><say> that Bob doesn't like cats

Discussion in 'English Only' started by JJXR, Nov 28, 2018.

  1. JJXR

    JJXR Senior Member

    Russian
    Hello to all,

    Thanks for reading my post.


    Sample sentence:

    My friend Bob told me earlier today that he didn't like cats. Now, I've met my other friend Chris, and I <am saying><say> that Bob doesn't like cats.

    Question:

    Is only the simple present "say" correct in the above sentence?


    Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions!

    Regards,
    JJXR
     
  2. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    I am sure I have told you twice before about the difference between the simple form of the verb and the continuous form of the verb:
    the simple form is complete, and the continuous form is incomplete.

    If you use the continuous form, then your sentence has to conclude with either, e.g. "...and when I had finished she said..." or a second action, e.g. "... when Bob, himself walks into the room."

    (I am assuming that you are using the present historic.)
     
  3. JJXR

    JJXR Senior Member

    Russian
    Thanks for the explanation, PaulQ.
     
  4. taraa

    taraa Senior Member

    Persian
    Hi PaulQ
    Why should we conclude with either...?
     
  5. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    o_O Because, otherwise, you have started to say something and have not finished it.
     
  6. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    With no plausible context, we don't know what's going on. It's hard to understand why you are using a present tense.:)
     
  7. taraa

    taraa Senior Member

    Persian
    Thank you :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2018
  8. JJXR

    JJXR Senior Member

    Russian
    Situation #1:

    For example, Bob told me earlier today that he didn't like cats. I want to tell Chris that Bob doesn't like cats. But I'm not sure if I should do so because I don't know what Chris's reaction might be. I'm afraid that Chris will hit me. So, I ask John for his opinion:

    I need your advice, John. Imagine the following situation. My friend Bob told me earlier today that he didn't like cats. Now, I've met my other friend Chris, and I <say> that Bob doesn't like cats. Do you think Chris will hit me if I say that to him?

    Situation #2:

    I've just met Chris and have started saying "Bob doesn't like cats", but John has just called me and interrupted me. So, I haven't finished saying "Bob doesn't like cats":

    John: "Hi JJXR! What happened to you earlier today?"

    Me: "Hi John! My friend Bob told me earlier today that he didn't like cats. Now, I've met my other friend Chris, and I <am saying> that Bob doesn't like cats. Listen, John, I'll call you later because I'm talking to Chirs. Bye!"


    Question:

    Have I used "say" and "am saying" correctly in the two situations that I've created above?
     
  9. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    Strange context.

    I need your advice, John. Imagine the following situation. My friend Bob told me earlier today that he doesn't like cats. Now, I've met my other friend Chris, and I'm just about to tell him that Bob doesn't like cats. Do you think Chris will hit me if I say that to him?

    Me: "Hi John! My friend Bob told me earlier today that he doesn't like cats. Now, I've met my other friend Chris, and I was just telling him/have just been telling him that Bob doesn't like cats. Listen, John, I'll call you later because I'm talking to Chris. Bye!"


     
  10. JJXR

    JJXR Senior Member

    Russian
    Thanks for the explanation, velisarius.
     

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