and I doubt not will prove a valuable acquaintance

Discussion in 'English Only' started by makeeverything, Mar 8, 2012.

  1. makeeverything Senior Member

    chinese-english
    He seems to be a most conscientious and polite young man,upon my word;and I doubt not will prove a valuable acquaintance.The title part confused me in grammar.Is the sentence wrong?"I doubt not will prove a valuable acquaintance"?In the clause,the subject is missing?
     
  2. modulus Senior Member

    ইংরেজি - আমেরিক
    This is quote from Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice. You need to specify that in your post. The sentence is grammatically correct. I don't know what you mean by the "title part".

    I doubt not [he] will prove a valuable acquaintance = I don't doubt that he will...
     
  3. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - England
    Hello Makeeverything,

    Jane Austen was writing two hundred years ago and English practice has changed a certain amount since that time.

    I doubt not will prove a valuable acquaintance is quite confusing to a modern reader.

    I'll add a few words and modernise some of the idioms to make the grammar clearer.

    He seems to be a most conscientious and polite young man, I think; and I don't doubt that he will prove a valuable acquaintance.


    The subject of the clause, which seemed missing to you, is actually carried over from the previous sentence.

    As Modulus has pointed out, it helps us if you give the context in your opening post, so that we don't have to go searching for it.
     

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