"and not hoping that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions,"

shiness

Senior Member
Korean, South Korea.
Fearing the old woman would be frightened by their being alone, and not hoping that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions, he took hold of the door and drew it towards him to prevent the old woman from attempting to shut it again. -Context from Crime and Punishment-




The blue-cloured part of the quote is where I think things are laid a little strange to me. Allowing for the fact that he's going to soon murder the old woman, isn't it normal for him to SIMPLY HOPE his sight of himself would "disarm" her suspicions? Not that "and not hoping that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions," which implies he wants her to keep herself on guard, keep her suspicions over him to be vigilant.

Perhaps I've mistaken the use of "disarm" here. But I'm not really sure..

I'd like to hear what your opinion over this..I've pondered over this for nearly an hour and still not sure where I've misunderstood.

Thanks.
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    You may simply have a bad translation. This SITE has a different translation: "and by no means confident that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions, he took hold of..." which seems to make more sense.
     

    shiness

    Senior Member
    Korean, South Korea.
    Hi Joelline, from your suggested link to the quote, I took it that he didn't believe his figure would disarm her suspencions. And suddenly it comes to me that "not hoping" was used in the same way..

    I think I'm good and clear now. Thanks.
     
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