and off we went to "do Umbria"

gettare

Banned
English
Ciao,

So we rented a Ferrari, and off we went "to do" Umbria.

Dunque affittammo un Ferrari e ce ne andammo fare (yuk) Umbria.

Grazie
 
  • gilmerton86

    Member
    Italian
    Of course, this is not a simple sentence to translate because a literal translation would lead you to a sentence that has no meaning in Italian.
    I would suggest: "Abbiamo così affittato una Ferrari e siamo partiti per percorrere l'Umbria."
     

    conigliettapentita

    Senior Member
    italy italian
    Ciao gettare!
    I think this is a very friendly and a little tacky kind of an expression.
    In italian you can say "Abbiamo affittato una Ferrari e siamo andati a farci l'Umbria".
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Ciao,
    Vorrei tradurre questa frase:
    So we rented a Ferrari, and off we went "to do" Umbria.
    Il mio tentativo è:
    Dunque affittammo un Ferrari e ce ne andammo fare (yuk) Umbria.
    Si può migliorare?
    Grazie
    Please state your question clearly!:)

    "To do" a country, a region or a city is an expression typical of English-speaking tourists who decide to visit everything possible in a given area in a short time.

    Allora/quindi/dunque abbiamo noleggiato una Ferrari e ce ne siamo andati per fare il giro dell'Umbria.
    That's my attempt; wait for the natives!:)
    ------------
    PS Dal post di conigliettapentita vedo che si può tradurre letteralmente. Comunque forse in inglese ha un significato un po' negativo.
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Ciao,

    So we rented a Ferrari, and off we went "to do" Umbria.

    Dunque affittammo un Ferrari e ce ne andammo fare (yuk) Umbria.

    Grazie
    Gilmerton is right, of course! Another way of saying it would be ...a farci il giro dell'Umbria.

    This reminds me of a student I had at uni.
    During the oral, I asked:

    What did you do in London?
    He replied:
    I did a tourist! **:D (Ho fatto il turista is what he meant to say in Italian...)

    The moral of the story is that we have to be careful with these verbs in both languages!:D

    ** for our Italian friends: that means (more or less;)) "ho riempito di botte un turista" in BE (or in London, at least).

    Edit: actually, in real London English they'd say " I done a tourist"!!!
     
    Last edited:

    Azazel81

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Not in English!:D Naughty boy.....;):)
    I'm not a naughty boy :mad::rolleyes::p

    Anyway... Weird.. in AmE I've heard many times people say stuff like this:

    A: "Hey buddy, what's up? Did you do someone new tonight?"
    B: "Hey man.. yep, big time! I did Jessica? Do you remember her?"
    [...]

    Did I misunderstand speeches like this?

    EDIT: of course this thread is not the case... but since we were also talking about the different meanings of the expression "to do"...
     

    gettare

    Banned
    English
    First of all, thanks for your responses. I must admit that "doing Umbria" has an arrogant and somewhat "tacky" aspect to it. It is a phrase that I would personally not use in any context. Hey let's face it, there was a rated x movie once called "Debbie does Dallas" and the phrase earned it's deservedly bad rep then and there.
    So why am I adopting it. I am doing a satire a snobby couple who think they own the the universe and are on a world tour and are writing letters home. Their uncomfortable personalities are slowly being revealed in their as they move from country to country and their words and attitudes catch up to them. So, I'm on your side! Thanks for your understanding.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Yes the first thing that came to my dirty mind when I saw "do the tourist" was "farsi la turista"... And in GB I always lived near or in London! I don't think it's particularly AE.

    Of course "do someone" (or "do someone over") does also mean "riempire di botte" as LC says. There's nothing sexual in the threat "I'll do you!"

    PS re the original question. To "do" a place gives the idea of a coachload of tourists with a tight schedule having a very rapid look at each place they visit ("this is the Louvre and you've got ten minutes!"), understanding very little but going home with hundreds of photos to boast about where they've been.
     

    gettare

    Banned
    English
    Exactly, the phrase does have it's redeeming, but still naive side. Thanks again for your help and perspective.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Yes the first thing that came to my dirty mind when I saw "do the tourist" was "farsi la turista"... And in GB I always lived near or in London! I don't think it's particularly AE. It would never have occurred to me.....too much of a Londoner, evidently!;)

    Of course "do someone" (or "do someone over") does also mean "riempire di botte" as LC says. There's nothing sexual in the threat "I'll do you!"

    PS re the original question. To "do" a place gives the idea of a coachload of tourists with a tight schedule having a very rapid look at each place they visit ("this is the Louvre and you've got ten minutes!"), understanding very little but going home with hundreds of photos to boast about where they've been. It's Tuesday, it must be Belgium, you mean!:D
     

    gettare

    Banned
    English
    Yes, you characterize it well with reference to the Louvre and Belgium.

    There is also a hierarchical level of snobbery when one "does" something (having nothing to do with sex). It's like super slumming, contemptuous, despicable behavior -- curiously having nothing to do with going outside the boundaries of political correctness (oh how I hate that phrase) by not being compassionate toward others problems. It's more of a nihilistic thing, a Raskolnikov thing. Perhaps I'm overdoing this. Ciao
     
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