and or , and?

< Previous | Next >

hehola

Member
Chinese
Should I add a comma before "and" in these sentences below? Why?


01 He suddenly appeared and said blah blah blah.

02 I am an animal lover and am looking for a lovely puppy

03 My sister is a good lady and works as a teacher in school.

and should I add the second "that" in this sentence?
04 This book tells me that animals are cute and that the earth belongs to all of us

MANY THANKS!
 
  • Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hello,

    Either of these sentences could be written with or without a comma, but here is what I would suggest:

    Should I add a comma before "and" in these sentences below? Why?


    01 He suddenly appeared and said blah blah blah.
    Comma before "and", and also after "said".

    There are some contexts where you would want to leave the comma out before "and", but I think that the majority of the time, it should be included. If there's no comma, whatever comes before "and" ("He suddenly appeared") will sound less important.

    02 I am an animal lover and am looking for a lovely puppy
    No comma.

    03 My sister is a good lady and works as a teacher in school.
    No comma, but the word "and" sounds strange here -- I would suggest replacing it with "who" (thus, "a good lady who works as a teacher ...").

    and should I add the second "that" in this sentence?
    04 This book tells me that animals are cute and that the earth belongs to all of us
    Yes, I think so. If you leave out the second "that", it might sound like "the earth belongs to all of us" is your own opinion, rather than the book's.

    Also, I'd recommend no comma before "and" in this sentence.
     
    Last edited:

    hehola

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much, Gavril :)
    2 questions:
    Hello, Comma before "and", and also after "said". There are some contexts where you would want to leave the comma out before "and", but I think that the majority of the time, it should be included. If there's no comma, whatever comes before "and" ("He suddenly appeared") will sound less important.
    But if so, it seems that "said" has no subject.
    Even so, the sentences below are both correct, right?
    He suddenly appeared, and said blah blah blah.
    He suddenly appeared, and he said blah blah blah.
    which one is better?

    And this one
    - My sister is a good lady and works as a teacher in school.
    If the sentence looks like this: My sister is a good lady and loves children very much.
    I think it also could be: My sister is a good lady who loves children very much. but I noticed there are many people writing sentences like my original example of this one.

    by the way, I think this sentence is weird. is it correct?
    "I noticed there are many people writing sentences like my original example of this one."


    Thnak you very much.
     
    Last edited:

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Thank you very much, Gavril :)
    2 questions:

    But if so, it seems that "said" has no subject.
    No, the subject is understood to be the same person/thing that was the subject of the other verb.

    So, in the sentence "He suddenly appeared, and said, ...", the subject of the first verb is "he", and the subject of the second verb is also understood to be "he".

    Even so, the sentences below are both correct, right?
    He suddenly appeared, and said blah blah blah.
    He suddenly appeared, and he said blah blah blah.
    which one is better?
    The first one is better. Normally, you don't need to repeat the subject of two verbs joined with "and".

    And this one

    If the sentence looks like this: My sister is a good lady and loves children very much.
    I think it also could be: My sister is a good lady who loves children very much.
    I think the second sentence is more normal, because it sounds like an explanation of why she is a good lady (namely, because she loves children very much).

    In the first sentence, it sounds as though you're putting equal emphasis on the two qualities (1. "she is a good lady", 2. "she loves children very much") rather than drawing a connection between the two qualities (as in the second sentence).

    but I noticed there are many people writing sentences like my original example of this one.
    This type of sentence may be common in informal English, but I still wouldn't recommend using it.

    The problem is that, when you say something like, "She is a good person", "John is a wonderful friend", and so on, it's normally expected that you will either follow this with an explanation of how/why the person is good or wonderful ("She always keeps her promises", "He has helped me a lot", etc.), or change the subject to talk about another person/thing ("Jack, on the other hand, is not a very nice guy").

    But, if you say, "My sister is a good lady and works as a teacher", it sounds as though you are shifting the focus away from your sister's goodness, and onto some other detail of your sister's life.

    Hopefully that makes sense -- let me know if you have any more questions.


    by the way, I think this sentence is weird. is it correct?
    "I noticed there are many people writing sentences like my original example of this one."
    I'd recommend saying,

    "Sentences like the one in my original example ("My sister is a good lady ...") are fairly common, in my experience."

    Phrases like "my original example", "his original point", etc. can be very easy to misinterpret, so I included a direct quote of what I was referring to in parentheses above.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    In my opinion, no comma is needed or desirable in any of your three sentences.

    (Your question about "that" is, I think, a separate question. A moderator may tell you that it needs a new thread.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top